Coastlines, CAGs and communications

Jane Johnston, Steve Gration

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This paper layers communication theory over a cultural context by examining how Community Action Groups (CAGs) have responded to development along Australian coastlines. It analyses how communication and media strategies and techniques have been adopted by the third sector to challenge commercial and government organisations which have proposed coastal development. As noted by Huntsman (2001): 'It is this appropriation of the beach for the purposes of capitalism, and the contesting ideas about the beach that have captured the attention of critics. 'Indeed these critics, who in this paper are members of strategic alliances, or CAGs, exist all along the Australian coastline. The paper seeks to highlight how the connections that are felt with Australia's coasts provide a special impetus and motivation for CAGs which have emerged in response to development along Australia's coasts, from Western Australia to New South Wales and Queensland.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)166-179
Number of pages14
JournalMedia International Australia
Issue number127
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2008
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

Johnston, Jane ; Gration, Steve. / Coastlines, CAGs and communications. In: Media International Australia. 2008 ; No. 127. pp. 166-179.
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Coastlines, CAGs and communications. / Johnston, Jane; Gration, Steve.

In: Media International Australia, No. 127, 05.2008, p. 166-179.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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