Clinical research: Room for all?

Sylvia Rodger, Sharon Mickan, Leigh Tooth, Jenny Strong

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

[Extract] As occupational therapists, we value diversity and individuality in our clients. We are challenged to incorporate these values in all work environments. Nowhere are these challenges more evident than in the area of research. As a practice‐based profession, we are being urged to demonstrate the worth of our intervention through rigorous research. To do this, clinicians are challenged to clarify and measure the outcomes of intervention, many of which are difficult to extricate. As a result many perceive this as a time of threat and vulnerability, as they define and quantify the evidence base for occupational therapy intervention. However, this challenge to validate our core contribution via research offers an opportunity to revisit our professional values and appreciate the diversity of research contribution from our colleagues. Just as there is a breadth of clinical expertise within the profession, occupational therapists have a range of skills and expertise in clinical research.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)40-43
Number of pages4
JournalAustralian Occupational Therapy Journal
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Mar 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Research
Occupational Therapy
Individuality
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Occupational Therapists

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Rodger, Sylvia ; Mickan, Sharon ; Tooth, Leigh ; Strong, Jenny. / Clinical research: Room for all?. In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal. 2003 ; Vol. 50, No. 1. pp. 40-43.
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Clinical research: Room for all? / Rodger, Sylvia; Mickan, Sharon; Tooth, Leigh; Strong, Jenny.

In: Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, Vol. 50, No. 1, 17.03.2003, p. 40-43.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearchpeer-review

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