Challenges and facilitators in delivering optimal care at the End of Life for older patients: a scoping review on the clinicians’ perspective

Samantha Fien*, Emily Plunkett, Claudia Fien, Sally Greenaway, Daren K Heyland, Justin Clark, Magnolia Cardona

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The concepts and elements determining quality of care at the End of Life may vary across professional groups but there is consensus that high quality care at the End of Life is beneficial for the patient, families, health systems and society at large. This scoping review aimed to elucidate gaps in the delivery of this specific type of care in older people from the clinicians’ perspective, and to identify potential solutions to both improve this care and promote work satisfaction by the involved clinicians.
Twelve studies published since 2010 with data from 18 countries identified four major gaps: 1. Core clinical competencies; 2. Shared decision-making; 3. Health care system, environmental context, and resources; and 4. Organisational leadership, culture and legislation. Multiple suggestions for staff communications training, multidisciplinary mentoring, and advance care planning alignment with patient wishes were identified. However, a clear picture arose of consistently unmet needs that have been previously highlighted in research for more than a decade. This indicates poor uptake of previous recommendations and highlights the difficulties in changing the service culture to ensure provision of optimal services at the End of Life. Future investigations on the reasons for poor uptake and identification of effective approaches to execute the agreed recommendations are warranted.
Study Pro tocol : https://osf.io/5u964/ Date of registration 13/11/2019
Original languageEnglish
JournalAging Clinical and Experimental Research
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 13 Mar 2021

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