Causality between Energy Consumption and Economic Growth in the Presence of Growth Volatility: Multi-Country Evidence

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Abstract

Falling energy intensity (increasing efficiency) is believed to be a result of more efficient production methods that have evolved over time, indicating overall sustainability in the production process. The objective of this study is to investigate the diminishing trend of energy intensity and the related volatilities in growth of energy consumption and income growth through the energy–growth nexus. The country specific long-run and short-run causal relationships among real energy consumption per capita, real GDP per capita, and the volatilities of growth in income and the growth in energy consumption are established using the method proposed by Yamamoto–Kurozumi within a cointegration framework in 48 countries. The overall findings suggest that energy intensity is falling, in conjunction with the existing evidence on the energy–growth nexus in most of the countries studied; hence, implicitly this confirms sustainability. The results based on volatility analysis show a significant decrease in energy use in response to increasing income growth volatility. The negative effects of income growth volatility on energy consumption are usually countered through compensation
measures, with subsidies provided to households and producers in order to smooth the energy consumption behaviours in those economies.
Original languageEnglish
Article number471
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Risk and Financial Management
Volume14
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Oct 2021

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