Casemix and rehabilitation evaluation of an early discharge scheme: Evaluation of an early discharge scheme

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Abstract

This paper presents a case study of an early discharge scheme funded by casemix incentives and discusses limitations of a casemix model of funding whereby hospital inpatient care is funded separately from care in other settings. The POSITIVE Rehabilitation program received 151 patients discharged early from hospital in a twelve-month period. Program evaluation demonstrates a 40.9% drop in the average length of stay of rehabilitation patients and a 42.6% drop in average length of stay for patients with stroke. Other benefits of the program include a high level of patient satisfaction, improved carer support and increased continuity of care. The challenge under the Australian interpretation of a casemix model of funding is ensuring the viability of services that extend across acute hospital, non-acute care, and community and home settings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)154-161
Number of pages8
JournalAustralian Health Review
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000
Externally publishedYes

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Rehabilitation
Length of Stay
Continuity of Patient Care
Program Evaluation
Home Care Services
Patient Satisfaction
Caregivers
Motivation
Inpatients
Stroke

Cite this

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title = "Casemix and rehabilitation evaluation of an early discharge scheme: Evaluation of an early discharge scheme",
abstract = "This paper presents a case study of an early discharge scheme funded by casemix incentives and discusses limitations of a casemix model of funding whereby hospital inpatient care is funded separately from care in other settings. The POSITIVE Rehabilitation program received 151 patients discharged early from hospital in a twelve-month period. Program evaluation demonstrates a 40.9{\%} drop in the average length of stay of rehabilitation patients and a 42.6{\%} drop in average length of stay for patients with stroke. Other benefits of the program include a high level of patient satisfaction, improved carer support and increased continuity of care. The challenge under the Australian interpretation of a casemix model of funding is ensuring the viability of services that extend across acute hospital, non-acute care, and community and home settings.",
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Casemix and rehabilitation evaluation of an early discharge scheme : Evaluation of an early discharge scheme. / Brandis, Susan.

In: Australian Health Review, Vol. 23, No. 3, 2000, p. 154-161.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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