Can Shared Decision Making Improve Physician Well-Being and Reduce Burnout?

Claudia C Dobler, Colin P West, Victor M Montori

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialResearchpeer-review

Abstract

There are many causes of physician burnout in today's health care environment, including an ever increasing administrative workload, pressure to do more work in less time, and a drive to reduce costs and improve patient outcomes. Importantly, lack of meaning in work is a crucial documented driver of physician burnout. Clinical encounters perceived as meaningful by physicians could therefore potentially positively impact physician well-being. Here we reflect on the potential of interventions that aim to enhance the patient-physician interaction, such as shared decision making, to improve physician well-being by facilitating interactions with patients that are perceived as meaningful.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e1615
JournalCureus
Volume9
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Aug 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Decision Making
Physicians
Workload
Delivery of Health Care
Pressure
Costs and Cost Analysis

Cite this

Dobler, Claudia C ; West, Colin P ; Montori, Victor M. / Can Shared Decision Making Improve Physician Well-Being and Reduce Burnout?. In: Cureus. 2017 ; Vol. 9, No. 8. pp. e1615.
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Can Shared Decision Making Improve Physician Well-Being and Reduce Burnout? / Dobler, Claudia C; West, Colin P; Montori, Victor M.

In: Cureus, Vol. 9, No. 8, 27.08.2017, p. e1615.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialResearchpeer-review

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