Can mid-semester examinations predict outcomes of final examinations when mature adult learners participate in different modes of on-line learning?

Nancy Low Choy*, Michael Pahoff, Nikki Milne, Mary Lynch, Michael Steele

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Can mid-semester examinations predict outcomes of final examinations when mature adult learners participate in different modes of on-line learning? Nancy L Low Choy, Bond University Michael Pahoff, Bond University Nikki Milne, Bond University Mary Lynch, Australian Catholic University Michael Steele, Bond University Question: Do mid-semester exams predict outcomes at the end of semester when traditional online learning curricula or web based problem based learning (PBL) with tutorial support was undertaken by physiotherapists returning to the work-force? Design: A prospective observational study. Participants: Sixteen physiotherapists (15 female; 1 male), working less than two days each week were recruited and randomized into two models of on-line learning. Intervention: Musculoskeletal (MS) and Neurological (Neuro) Physiotherapy were two subjects delivered across two semesters. An Objective Structured Clinical Examination with written and practical stations with/without standardized patients was undertaken at mid and end of semester. Outcome Measure: Examination results from these subjects were used to explore associations between mid, end-semester exams and final results. Results: Scores at mid semester (MS: r=.897, p=0.000; Neuro: r=.724, p=0.002) and end semester (MS: r=.958, p=0.000; Neuro: r=854, p<0.000) were highly associated with the final result. For MS physiotherapy, interpretative questions at mid-semester were highly associated with the final score (r=.807, p=0.000) more than procedural questions (history taken and physical assessment: r=.193-.403; p>0.05). For neurological physiotherapy, stations involving clinical decisions (handling/transfers/balance) better predicted final results (r=541; p=0.031) than stations examining techniques or outcome measures (r=.190-445; p>0.05). Stations with standardized patients (end semester exam) were highly associated with the final result (r=.830<0.000). Conclusion: Interpretative questions modelled on case studies with clinical decisions at mid-semester were highly associated with the final examination result and predicted outcomes for mature aged learners ready to return to, or increase participation, in the work-force.
Original languageEnglish
Pages117
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2011
EventAPA Physiotherapy Conference 2011 - Brisbane, Brisbane, Australia
Duration: 27 Oct 201130 Oct 2011

Conference

ConferenceAPA Physiotherapy Conference 2011
Abbreviated titleAPA 2011
CountryAustralia
CityBrisbane
Period27/10/1130/10/11

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    Low Choy, N., Pahoff, M., Milne, N., Lynch, M., & Steele, M. (2011). Can mid-semester examinations predict outcomes of final examinations when mature adult learners participate in different modes of on-line learning?. 117. Abstract from APA Physiotherapy Conference 2011, Brisbane, Australia.