Built heritage policy and incentives: Australian and Tanzanian conservation perspectives

Johari Amar, Lynne Armitage

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

Abstract

When it comes to sustainable heritage management, heritage stakeholders – who generally aren't policy makers – are often required to make a financial contribution before being issued with funds to cover costs for conserving the authenticity and integrity of built heritage. In doing so, many corporate owners of heritage and developers have become surrogate to a laissez-faire market which facilitates demolition by way of neglect, or intent, of heritage assets throughout the world. While there is little doubt that the historic tax credits or other forms of financial offset – such as the USA Federal Rehabilitation Tax Credit and UK Lottery funding – have been making a desirable contribution to slowing down the destruction and loss of historic fabric in those jurisdictions. Such is not the norm, more frequently many governments have continue to operate a heritage policy framework unsupported of financial offsets or tax incentives for conserving heritage assets under private ownership. This paper reviews the current issues facing the built heritage sector in addressing this discourse using Australia and Tanzania as a comparative case study. It then discusses the prospects of enhancing institutional arrangements, both government and private, which can benefit the broader communities.

Key words: Built heritage conservation, financial offsets, conservation easement, tax credits, Australia, Tanzania.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationREHAB 2019 - Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Preservation, Maintenance and Rehabilitation of Historic Buildings and Structures
EditorsRogerio Amoeda, Sergio Lira, Cristina Pinheiro
Place of PublicationBarcelos
PublisherGreen Lines Institute for Sustainable Development
Chapter5
Pages325-335
Number of pages11
ISBN (Electronic)978-989-8734-42-6
ISBN (Print) 978-989-8734-41-9
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2019
EventREHAB 2019 - 4th International Conference on Preservation, Maintenance and Rehabilitation of Historic Buildings and Structures - Guimaraes, Portugal
Duration: 17 Jul 201919 Jul 2019
Conference number: 4th
http://rehab.greenlines-institute.org/en/home

Conference

ConferenceREHAB 2019 - 4th International Conference on Preservation, Maintenance and Rehabilitation of Historic Buildings and Structures
CountryPortugal
CityGuimaraes
Period17/07/1919/07/19
OtherREHAB 2019 aims to proceed with the discussion on built heritage and the preservation of its legacy, namely the conservation of historic constructions (built landscapes, urban fabrics, buildings, engineering works) as part of the cultural heritage.
Internet address

Fingerprint

taxes
conservation
incentive
credit
Tanzania
assets
authenticity
rehabilitation
integrity
neglect
jurisdiction
funding
stakeholder
discourse
market
costs
management
community

Cite this

Amar, J., & Armitage, L. (2019). Built heritage policy and incentives: Australian and Tanzanian conservation perspectives. In R. Amoeda, S. Lira, & C. Pinheiro (Eds.), REHAB 2019 - Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Preservation, Maintenance and Rehabilitation of Historic Buildings and Structures (pp. 325-335). Barcelos: Green Lines Institute for Sustainable Development.
Amar, Johari ; Armitage, Lynne. / Built heritage policy and incentives: Australian and Tanzanian conservation perspectives. REHAB 2019 - Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Preservation, Maintenance and Rehabilitation of Historic Buildings and Structures. editor / Rogerio Amoeda ; Sergio Lira ; Cristina Pinheiro. Barcelos : Green Lines Institute for Sustainable Development, 2019. pp. 325-335
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Amar, J & Armitage, L 2019, Built heritage policy and incentives: Australian and Tanzanian conservation perspectives. in R Amoeda, S Lira & C Pinheiro (eds), REHAB 2019 - Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Preservation, Maintenance and Rehabilitation of Historic Buildings and Structures. Green Lines Institute for Sustainable Development, Barcelos, pp. 325-335, REHAB 2019 - 4th International Conference on Preservation, Maintenance and Rehabilitation of Historic Buildings and Structures , Guimaraes, Portugal, 17/07/19.

Built heritage policy and incentives: Australian and Tanzanian conservation perspectives. / Amar, Johari ; Armitage, Lynne.

REHAB 2019 - Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Preservation, Maintenance and Rehabilitation of Historic Buildings and Structures. ed. / Rogerio Amoeda; Sergio Lira; Cristina Pinheiro. Barcelos : Green Lines Institute for Sustainable Development, 2019. p. 325-335.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

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Amar J, Armitage L. Built heritage policy and incentives: Australian and Tanzanian conservation perspectives. In Amoeda R, Lira S, Pinheiro C, editors, REHAB 2019 - Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Preservation, Maintenance and Rehabilitation of Historic Buildings and Structures. Barcelos: Green Lines Institute for Sustainable Development. 2019. p. 325-335