Building registration: training and housing quality

Jim Georgiou, Jim Smith, Peter Love

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The lack of attention to quality control by house builders has been a contentious issue for more than three decades. In an attempt to improve the quality of housing, various mechanisms have been adopted and discarded by industry-based organisations and government legislation. Now that registration of builders has been achieved (since 1995) the regulating authority, the Building Commission have placed the maintenance of standards from registered builders at the forefront of their priorities. The provision of suitable training and continuing professional development programs is likely to receive greater attention over the next few years. However, a key factor that is often overlooked in the debate on quality of house construction is the use of subcontract labour by both, registered builders and owner builders. The repetitive nature of some activities ensures that tacit knowledge within the subcontract system becomes an integral part of house construction. Research by the authors into defects in housing has provided some interesting analyses from the statistic collected. This paper analyses the incidence of defects over a number of years in a range of functional elements within the house envelope and presents the results. Particular attention is paid to the incidence of defects where the licensed trades are involved compared to the non-licensed trades and elements. This work suggests where housing defects are likely to occur and the authors suggest that appropriate educational resources may be directed to areas where it will be most effective and beneficial. The authors propose a more integrated and inclusive approach.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings 19th Annual ARCOM Conference
EditorsDavid Greenwood
PublisherAssociation of Researchers in Construction Management
Pages299-308
Volume1
ISBN (Print) 0 9534161 8 6
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2003
Externally publishedYes
EventThe 19th Annual Association of Researchers in Construction Management Conference - University of Brighton, Brighton, United Kingdom
Duration: 3 Sep 20035 Sep 2003
Conference number: 19th
http://www.arcom.ac.uk/abstracts-results.php?s=19th%20Annual%20ARCOM%20Conference&b=b (19th Annual ARCOM Conference Proceedings)
http://www.arcom.ac.uk/

Conference

ConferenceThe 19th Annual Association of Researchers in Construction Management Conference
Abbreviated titleARCOM
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityBrighton
Period3/09/035/09/03
Internet address

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housing quality
housing
incidence
builder
quality control
legislation
statistics
labor
industry
lack
resources

Cite this

Georgiou, J., Smith, J., & Love, P. (2003). Building registration: training and housing quality. In D. Greenwood (Ed.), Proceedings 19th Annual ARCOM Conference (Vol. 1, pp. 299-308). Association of Researchers in Construction Management.
Georgiou, Jim ; Smith, Jim ; Love, Peter. / Building registration: training and housing quality. Proceedings 19th Annual ARCOM Conference. editor / David Greenwood. Vol. 1 Association of Researchers in Construction Management, 2003. pp. 299-308
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title = "Building registration: training and housing quality",
abstract = "The lack of attention to quality control by house builders has been a contentious issue for more than three decades. In an attempt to improve the quality of housing, various mechanisms have been adopted and discarded by industry-based organisations and government legislation. Now that registration of builders has been achieved (since 1995) the regulating authority, the Building Commission have placed the maintenance of standards from registered builders at the forefront of their priorities. The provision of suitable training and continuing professional development programs is likely to receive greater attention over the next few years. However, a key factor that is often overlooked in the debate on quality of house construction is the use of subcontract labour by both, registered builders and owner builders. The repetitive nature of some activities ensures that tacit knowledge within the subcontract system becomes an integral part of house construction. Research by the authors into defects in housing has provided some interesting analyses from the statistic collected. This paper analyses the incidence of defects over a number of years in a range of functional elements within the house envelope and presents the results. Particular attention is paid to the incidence of defects where the licensed trades are involved compared to the non-licensed trades and elements. This work suggests where housing defects are likely to occur and the authors suggest that appropriate educational resources may be directed to areas where it will be most effective and beneficial. The authors propose a more integrated and inclusive approach.",
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Georgiou, J, Smith, J & Love, P 2003, Building registration: training and housing quality. in D Greenwood (ed.), Proceedings 19th Annual ARCOM Conference. vol. 1, Association of Researchers in Construction Management, pp. 299-308, The 19th Annual Association of Researchers in Construction Management Conference, Brighton, United Kingdom, 3/09/03.

Building registration: training and housing quality. / Georgiou, Jim; Smith, Jim; Love, Peter.

Proceedings 19th Annual ARCOM Conference. ed. / David Greenwood. Vol. 1 Association of Researchers in Construction Management, 2003. p. 299-308.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

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Georgiou J, Smith J, Love P. Building registration: training and housing quality. In Greenwood D, editor, Proceedings 19th Annual ARCOM Conference. Vol. 1. Association of Researchers in Construction Management. 2003. p. 299-308