Building capability for disaster resilience

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)
16 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

All levels of government recognise the widespread devastation of communities by natural or other disasters. They have responded with emergency management arrangements and policies to enhance government and community capacity to anticipate, withstand and recover from disastrous events. Although the construction industry has a significant role to play, particularly in recovery and reconstruction, it has not generally been considered as a key stakeholder in building capability for disaster resilience. One barrier to more active involvement of the construction industry in disaster response and management is that traditional methods of construction project management have been criticised as too time consuming and inflexible for use under circumstances of high uncertainty, requiring rapid response in complex multi-stakeholder environments. The 2011 Queensland floods represent one of the most disastrous extreme weather events of recent times. Using this event as a case study, this paper presents results of analysis of institutionalised discourse concerning structures, policies and procedures for disaster management, and official inquiry reports providing details of response and recovery activity. The aim of the research is to identify the positioning of project management in the disaster management discourse as a first step towards earlier and more proactive involvement by the construction industry and use of project management approaches that contribute to disaster resilience.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings 28th Annual ARCOM Conference
EditorsS.D. Smith
Place of PublicationUnited Kingdom
PublisherAssociation of Researchers in Construction Management
Pages123-132
Number of pages10
Volume1
ISBN (Electronic)9780955239069
Publication statusPublished - 2012
EventAnnual Conference of the Association of Researchers in Construction Management - Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Duration: 3 Sep 20125 Sep 2012
Conference number: 28th
http://www.arcom.ac.uk/conf-intro.php

Conference

ConferenceAnnual Conference of the Association of Researchers in Construction Management
Abbreviated titleARCOM 2012
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityEdinburgh
Period3/09/125/09/12
Internet address

Fingerprint

Disasters
Construction industry
Project management
Recovery
Resilience
Disaster management
Disaster
Government
Discourse
Stakeholders
Disaster response
Emergency management
Weather
Construction project management
Queensland
Uncertainty
Positioning

Cite this

Crawford, L., Langston, C., & Bajracharya, B. (2012). Building capability for disaster resilience. In S. D. Smith (Ed.), Proceedings 28th Annual ARCOM Conference (Vol. 1, pp. 123-132). United Kingdom: Association of Researchers in Construction Management.
Crawford, Lynn ; Langston, Craig ; Bajracharya, Bhishna. / Building capability for disaster resilience. Proceedings 28th Annual ARCOM Conference. editor / S.D. Smith. Vol. 1 United Kingdom : Association of Researchers in Construction Management, 2012. pp. 123-132
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Crawford, L, Langston, C & Bajracharya, B 2012, Building capability for disaster resilience. in SD Smith (ed.), Proceedings 28th Annual ARCOM Conference. vol. 1, Association of Researchers in Construction Management, United Kingdom, pp. 123-132, Annual Conference of the Association of Researchers in Construction Management, Edinburgh, United Kingdom, 3/09/12.

Building capability for disaster resilience. / Crawford, Lynn; Langston, Craig; Bajracharya, Bhishna.

Proceedings 28th Annual ARCOM Conference. ed. / S.D. Smith. Vol. 1 United Kingdom : Association of Researchers in Construction Management, 2012. p. 123-132.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

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Crawford L, Langston C, Bajracharya B. Building capability for disaster resilience. In Smith SD, editor, Proceedings 28th Annual ARCOM Conference. Vol. 1. United Kingdom: Association of Researchers in Construction Management. 2012. p. 123-132