Big Data and ICU Scoring Systems

James Todd, Adrian Gepp, Bruce J Vanstone, Brent Richards

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Severity scoring systems are used in
intensive care units for stratifying patients in clinical
research and benchmarking ICU performance. A variant
of the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation
(APACHE) system is used in Australia for benchmarking
purposes – the APACHE III-j. This and other major
scoring systems have been developed under an old
paradigm of minimum data collection, while the current
paradigm is to use all useful data. The APACHE III-j
system uses the worst observations in the first 24-hours of a patient’s ICU stay, ignoring the rest of the
distributional information. We hypothesise that scoring
system performance can be improved by adding
variables that capture this ignored distributional
information.
Methods: To test this hypothesis, the APACHE III-j system
will be replicated and compared to a modified version
that adds metrics describing the distribution of an
underlying physiology variable utilising high frequency
data. Data for the study is provided by the Gold Coast
University Hospital.
Results: Results were assessed by comparing the two
models on the basis on discrimination using ROC curves
and calibration through the Hosmer-Lemeshow statistics.
Discussion: Findings suggest future use of high frequency
data to capture additional distributional information to
improve severity scoring systems for use in ICUs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages47-48
Number of pages2
Publication statusPublished - 2017
EventThe First Gold Coast Health Research Week Conference 2017 - Gold Coast University Hospital, Gold Coast, Australia
Duration: 28 Nov 201730 Nov 2017
https://www.goldcoast.health.qld.gov.au/research/research-week

Conference

ConferenceThe First Gold Coast Health Research Week Conference 2017
CountryAustralia
CityGold Coast
Period28/11/1730/11/17
Internet address

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