Beyond IT interoperability assessment: Complexity analysis of the project context

Gregory J. Skulmoski, Francis T. Hartman

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperResearchpeer-review

Abstract

IT people do best what they are trained to do: examine interoperability issues through a technical lens. It may be unfair to ask of them to systematically and comprehensively analyze non-IT concerns of an interoperability project such as business strategy, constraints and governance. Yet to fully understand the feasibility of an interoperability project, IT people need to examine non-IT factors that can make or break these complex, expensive and time consuming projects. This paper is about a model that emerged from a research project about understanding the nature of IT projects. The Complexity-Based Project Classification Framework can be used to assess the feasibility of a business interoperability project. A three-round international Delphi project with a sample of 23 acknowledged experts identified and prioritized the non-technical project attributes that need to be analyzed when assessing IT project feasibility. The Complexity-Based Project Classification Framework emerged. The Complexity-Based Project Classification Framework is composed of three parts: preconditions, contextual complexity attributes and project effort attributes. Once preconditions are in place (e.g. the organization needs to support using this model for assessing the feasibility of business interoperability) then the project team can assess the interoperability project by considering its project effort attributes (e.g. technology) and project contextual attributes (e.g. relative project size). It is suggested that practitioners who use this Framework will have an improved understanding of the IT interoperability project feasibility.

Original languageEnglish
Pages109-119
Number of pages11
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2008
Externally publishedYes
Event
IBIMA Conference on Information Management in Modern Organizations
- Marrakech, Morocco
Duration: 4 Jan 20086 Jan 2008
Conference number: 9th

Conference

Conference
IBIMA Conference on Information Management in Modern Organizations
Abbreviated titleIBIMA
CountryMorocco
CityMarrakech
Period4/01/086/01/08

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Interoperability
Industry
Lenses
IT project

Cite this

Skulmoski, G. J., & Hartman, F. T. (2008). Beyond IT interoperability assessment: Complexity analysis of the project context. 109-119. Paper presented at
IBIMA Conference on Information Management in Modern Organizations, Marrakech, Morocco.
Skulmoski, Gregory J. ; Hartman, Francis T. / Beyond IT interoperability assessment : Complexity analysis of the project context. Paper presented at
IBIMA Conference on Information Management in Modern Organizations, Marrakech, Morocco.11 p.
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Skulmoski, GJ & Hartman, FT 2008, 'Beyond IT interoperability assessment: Complexity analysis of the project context' Paper presented at
IBIMA Conference on Information Management in Modern Organizations, Marrakech, Morocco, 4/01/08 - 6/01/08, pp. 109-119.

Beyond IT interoperability assessment : Complexity analysis of the project context. / Skulmoski, Gregory J.; Hartman, Francis T.

2008. 109-119 Paper presented at
IBIMA Conference on Information Management in Modern Organizations, Marrakech, Morocco.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperResearchpeer-review

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Skulmoski GJ, Hartman FT. Beyond IT interoperability assessment: Complexity analysis of the project context. 2008. Paper presented at
IBIMA Conference on Information Management in Modern Organizations, Marrakech, Morocco.