Backpacking tourism: An exploratory investigation into the consequential effects post-university, backpacker travel can have on graduates’ future employability

Robert Nash, Fiona Bruce

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Backpacking has been a popular means of travel amongst graduates for decades. Much research has been conducted on several different aspects of the backpacking experience over the last thirty years. One aspect which has not been explored by researchers however, is that of graduate employability upon returning from an extended period of backpacker travel. This study aims to identify whether or not post-university backpacking has a positive or negative effect on future employability. Questionnaires were distributed to 101 students from The Robert Gordon University and telephone interviews were conducted with twelve local graduate employers. The results from the questionnaires were analysed using SPSS statistical software package and further tests were conducted in order to identify any significant results. The results from the telephone interviews were subjected to the qualitative analysis method known as pattern matching. The main findings from the study show that students and employers share the view that independence is developed whilst backpacking and yet they differ in terms of which skills are important to the workplace. Overall, there is a significant difference between the two samples in terms of the overall effect that backpacking has on future employability chances. Recommendations are made concerning further research into the different methods of backpacker travel and whether personality traits play a more significant role in the backpacker experience.
Original languageEnglish
Pages1-15
Number of pages15
Publication statusPublished - 2012
EventCouncil for Australasian University Tourism and Hospitality Education (CAUTHE) National Conference: The New Golden Age of Tourism and Hospitality - Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre, Melbourne, Australia
Duration: 6 Feb 20129 Feb 2012
Conference number: 22nd

Conference

ConferenceCouncil for Australasian University Tourism and Hospitality Education (CAUTHE) National Conference
Abbreviated titleCAUTHE Conference
CountryAustralia
CityMelbourne
Period6/02/129/02/12

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employability
Tourism
travel
telephone interview
graduate
university
employer
means of travel
questionnaire
SPSS
personality traits
experience
workplace
student

Cite this

Nash, R., & Bruce, F. (2012). Backpacking tourism: An exploratory investigation into the consequential effects post-university, backpacker travel can have on graduates’ future employability. 1-15. Abstract from Council for Australasian University Tourism and Hospitality Education (CAUTHE) National Conference, Melbourne, Australia.
Nash, Robert ; Bruce, Fiona. / Backpacking tourism : An exploratory investigation into the consequential effects post-university, backpacker travel can have on graduates’ future employability. Abstract from Council for Australasian University Tourism and Hospitality Education (CAUTHE) National Conference, Melbourne, Australia.15 p.
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Nash, R & Bruce, F 2012, 'Backpacking tourism: An exploratory investigation into the consequential effects post-university, backpacker travel can have on graduates’ future employability' Council for Australasian University Tourism and Hospitality Education (CAUTHE) National Conference, Melbourne, Australia, 6/02/12 - 9/02/12, pp. 1-15.

Backpacking tourism : An exploratory investigation into the consequential effects post-university, backpacker travel can have on graduates’ future employability. / Nash, Robert; Bruce, Fiona.

2012. 1-15 Abstract from Council for Australasian University Tourism and Hospitality Education (CAUTHE) National Conference, Melbourne, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

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Nash R, Bruce F. Backpacking tourism: An exploratory investigation into the consequential effects post-university, backpacker travel can have on graduates’ future employability. 2012. Abstract from Council for Australasian University Tourism and Hospitality Education (CAUTHE) National Conference, Melbourne, Australia.