Avoiding Program-Induced Cumulative Overload (PICO)

Robin Orr, Joseph J Knapik, Rodney Pope

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article defines the concept of program-induced cumulative overload (PICO), provides examples, and advises ways to mitigate the adverse effects. PICO is the excessive cumulative physical workload that can be imparted to military personnel by a military training program with an embedded physical training component. PICO can be acute (accumulating within a single day) or chronic (accumulating across the entirety of the program) and results in adverse outcomes for affected personnel, including detrimental fatigue, performance degradation, injuries, or illness. Strategies to mitigate PICO include focusing administration and logistic practices during the development and ongoing management of a trainee program and implementing known musculoskeletal injury prevention strategies. More training is not always better, and trainers need to consider the total amount of physical activity that military personnel experience across both operational training and physical training if PICO is to be mitigated.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-95
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of special operations medicine : a peer reviewed journal for SOF medical professionals
Volume16
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 28 Jul 2016

Fingerprint

Military Personnel
Education
Wounds and Injuries
Workload
Fatigue
Exercise

Cite this

@article{0d3ed6c4878b44959b2991a634771882,
title = "Avoiding Program-Induced Cumulative Overload (PICO)",
abstract = "This article defines the concept of program-induced cumulative overload (PICO), provides examples, and advises ways to mitigate the adverse effects. PICO is the excessive cumulative physical workload that can be imparted to military personnel by a military training program with an embedded physical training component. PICO can be acute (accumulating within a single day) or chronic (accumulating across the entirety of the program) and results in adverse outcomes for affected personnel, including detrimental fatigue, performance degradation, injuries, or illness. Strategies to mitigate PICO include focusing administration and logistic practices during the development and ongoing management of a trainee program and implementing known musculoskeletal injury prevention strategies. More training is not always better, and trainers need to consider the total amount of physical activity that military personnel experience across both operational training and physical training if PICO is to be mitigated.",
author = "Robin Orr and Knapik, {Joseph J} and Rodney Pope",
note = "2016.",
year = "2016",
month = "7",
day = "28",
language = "English",
volume = "16",
pages = "91--95",
journal = "Journal of special operations medicine : a peer reviewed journal for SOF medical professionals",
issn = "1553-9768",
publisher = "U.S. Special Operations Command",
number = "2",

}

Avoiding Program-Induced Cumulative Overload (PICO). / Orr, Robin; Knapik, Joseph J; Pope, Rodney.

In: Journal of special operations medicine : a peer reviewed journal for SOF medical professionals, Vol. 16, No. 2, 28.07.2016, p. 91-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Avoiding Program-Induced Cumulative Overload (PICO)

AU - Orr, Robin

AU - Knapik, Joseph J

AU - Pope, Rodney

N1 - 2016.

PY - 2016/7/28

Y1 - 2016/7/28

N2 - This article defines the concept of program-induced cumulative overload (PICO), provides examples, and advises ways to mitigate the adverse effects. PICO is the excessive cumulative physical workload that can be imparted to military personnel by a military training program with an embedded physical training component. PICO can be acute (accumulating within a single day) or chronic (accumulating across the entirety of the program) and results in adverse outcomes for affected personnel, including detrimental fatigue, performance degradation, injuries, or illness. Strategies to mitigate PICO include focusing administration and logistic practices during the development and ongoing management of a trainee program and implementing known musculoskeletal injury prevention strategies. More training is not always better, and trainers need to consider the total amount of physical activity that military personnel experience across both operational training and physical training if PICO is to be mitigated.

AB - This article defines the concept of program-induced cumulative overload (PICO), provides examples, and advises ways to mitigate the adverse effects. PICO is the excessive cumulative physical workload that can be imparted to military personnel by a military training program with an embedded physical training component. PICO can be acute (accumulating within a single day) or chronic (accumulating across the entirety of the program) and results in adverse outcomes for affected personnel, including detrimental fatigue, performance degradation, injuries, or illness. Strategies to mitigate PICO include focusing administration and logistic practices during the development and ongoing management of a trainee program and implementing known musculoskeletal injury prevention strategies. More training is not always better, and trainers need to consider the total amount of physical activity that military personnel experience across both operational training and physical training if PICO is to be mitigated.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85020318589&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 16

SP - 91

EP - 95

JO - Journal of special operations medicine : a peer reviewed journal for SOF medical professionals

JF - Journal of special operations medicine : a peer reviewed journal for SOF medical professionals

SN - 1553-9768

IS - 2

ER -