Authentic early experience in Medical Education: A socio-cultural analysis identifying important variables in learning interactions within workplaces

Sarah Yardley, Caragh Brosnan, Jane Richardson, Richard Hays

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper addresses the question 'what are the variables influencing social interactions and learning during Authentic Early Experience (AEE)?' AEE is a complex educational intervention for new medical students. Following critique of the existing literature, multiple qualitative methods were used to create a study framework conceptually orientated to a socio-cultural perspective. Study participants were recruited from three groups at one UK medical school: students, workplace supervisors, and medical school faculty. A series of intersecting spectra identified in the data describe dyadic variables that make explicit the parameters within which social interactions are conducted in this setting. Four of the spectra describe social processes related to being in workplaces and developing the ability to manage interactions during authentic early experiences. These are: (1) legitimacy expressed through invited participation or exclusion; (2) finding a role-a spectrum from student identity to doctor mindset; (3) personal perspectives and discomfort in transition from lay to medical; and, (4) taking responsibility for 'risk'-moving from aversion to management through graded progression of responsibility. Four further spectra describe educational consequences of social interactions. These spectra identify how the reality of learning is shaped through social interactions and are (1) generic-specific objectives, (2) parallel-integrated-learning, (3) context specific-transferable learning and (4) performing or simulating-reality. Attention to these variables is important if educators are to maximise constructive learning from AEE. Application of each of the spectra could assist workplace supervisors to maximise the positive learning potential of specific workplaces.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)873-891
Number of pages19
JournalAdvances in Health Sciences Education
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2013

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cultural analysis
Medical Education
Workplace
Interpersonal Relations
workplace
Learning
interaction
learning
education
experience
Medical Schools
Medical Students
Illegitimacy
Medical Faculties
responsibility
Aptitude
social learning
Risk-Taking
social process
qualitative method

Cite this

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Authentic early experience in Medical Education : A socio-cultural analysis identifying important variables in learning interactions within workplaces. / Yardley, Sarah; Brosnan, Caragh; Richardson, Jane; Hays, Richard.

In: Advances in Health Sciences Education, Vol. 18, No. 5, 12.2013, p. 873-891.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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