Australian domestic violence protection order legislation: A comparative quantitative content analysis of victim safety provisions

Samantha Jeffries, Christine E W Bond, Rachael M Field

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

In Australia, protection orders are a key legal response to domestic violence, and are oftenviewed as a way of providing for victim safety. For instance, recently the joint Australianand New South Wales Law Reform Commissions recommended that a common corepurpose of all state and territory domestic violence legislation should be 'to ensure ormaximise the safety and protection of persons who fear or experience family violence'(2010:Recommendation 7-4). Drawing and building upon prior research in Australia andthe United States ('US'), this paper uses comparative quantitative content analysis toassess the victim safety focus of domestic violence protection order legislation in eachAustralian state and territory. The findings of this analysis show that the NorthernTerritory, South Australia and Victoria 'stand out' from the other jurisdictions, having thehighest victim safety focus in their legislation. However, there remains sizeable scope forimprovement in all Australian jurisdictions, in terms of the victim safety focus of theirlegislative provisions and considerations of legislative inconsistency betweenjurisdictions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)627-643
Number of pages17
JournalCurrent Issues in Criminal Justice
Volume25
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

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domestic violence
content analysis
legislation
jurisdiction
law reform
violence
anxiety
human being
experience

Cite this

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Australian domestic violence protection order legislation : A comparative quantitative content analysis of victim safety provisions. / Jeffries, Samantha; Bond, Christine E W; Field, Rachael M.

In: Current Issues in Criminal Justice, Vol. 25, No. 2, 2013, p. 627-643.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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