Australian cardiac rehabilitation exercise parameter characteristics and perceptions of high-intensity interval training: a cross-sectional survey

Amanda Hannan, Wayne A Hing, Michael Climstein, James Furness, Satyajit Rohan Jayasinghe, Joshua Byrnes

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Abstract

Purpose: This study explored current demographics, characteristics, costs, evaluation methods, and outcome measures used in Australian cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs. It also determined the actual usage and perceptions of high-intensity interval training (HIIT).
Methods: A cross-sectional observational web-based survey was distributed to 328 Australian CR programs nationally.
Results: A total of 261 programs completed the survey (79.6% response rate). Most Australian CR programs were located in a hospital setting (76%), offered exercise sessions once a week (52%) for 6–8 weeks (49%) at moderate intensity (54%) for 46–60 min (62%), and serviced 101–500 clients per annum (38%). HIIT was reported in only 1% of programs, and 27% of respondents believed that it was safe while 42% of respondents were unsure. Lack of staff (25%), monitoring resources (20%), and staff knowledge (18%) were the most commonly reported
barriers to the implementation of HIIT. Overall, Australian CR coordinators are unsure of the cost of exercise sessions.
Conclusion: There is variability in CR delivery across Australia. Only half of programs reassess outcome measures postintervention, and cost of exercise sessions is unknown. Although HIIT is recommended in international CR guidelines, it is essentially not being used in Australia and clinicians are unsure as to the safety of HIIT. Lack of resources and staff knowledge were perceived as the biggest barriers to HIIT implementation, and there are inconsistent perceptions of prescreening and monitoring requirements. This study highlights the need to educate health professionals about the benefits and safety of HIIT to improve its usage and patient outcomes.
Keywords: coronary artery disease, exercise, interval training, cardiovascular disease
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-89
Number of pages11
JournalOpen Access Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Apr 2018

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Exercise Therapy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Costs and Cost Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Safety
Cardiac Rehabilitation
High-Intensity Interval Training
Coronary Artery Disease
Cardiovascular Diseases
Demography
Guidelines
Surveys and Questionnaires
Health

Cite this

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title = "Australian cardiac rehabilitation exercise parameter characteristics and perceptions of high-intensity interval training: a cross-sectional survey",
abstract = "Purpose: This study explored current demographics, characteristics, costs, evaluation methods, and outcome measures used in Australian cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs. It also determined the actual usage and perceptions of high-intensity interval training (HIIT).Methods: A cross-sectional observational web-based survey was distributed to 328 Australian CR programs nationally.Results: A total of 261 programs completed the survey (79.6{\%} response rate). Most Australian CR programs were located in a hospital setting (76{\%}), offered exercise sessions once a week (52{\%}) for 6–8 weeks (49{\%}) at moderate intensity (54{\%}) for 46–60 min (62{\%}), and serviced 101–500 clients per annum (38{\%}). HIIT was reported in only 1{\%} of programs, and 27{\%} of respondents believed that it was safe while 42{\%} of respondents were unsure. Lack of staff (25{\%}), monitoring resources (20{\%}), and staff knowledge (18{\%}) were the most commonly reportedbarriers to the implementation of HIIT. Overall, Australian CR coordinators are unsure of the cost of exercise sessions.Conclusion: There is variability in CR delivery across Australia. Only half of programs reassess outcome measures postintervention, and cost of exercise sessions is unknown. Although HIIT is recommended in international CR guidelines, it is essentially not being used in Australia and clinicians are unsure as to the safety of HIIT. Lack of resources and staff knowledge were perceived as the biggest barriers to HIIT implementation, and there are inconsistent perceptions of prescreening and monitoring requirements. This study highlights the need to educate health professionals about the benefits and safety of HIIT to improve its usage and patient outcomes.Keywords: coronary artery disease, exercise, interval training, cardiovascular disease",
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Australian cardiac rehabilitation exercise parameter characteristics and perceptions of high-intensity interval training: a cross-sectional survey. / Hannan, Amanda; Hing, Wayne A; Climstein, Michael; Furness, James; Jayasinghe, Satyajit Rohan; Byrnes, Joshua.

In: Open Access Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 9, 30.04.2018, p. 79-89.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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