Australian banks' approaches to privacy in an online world

Gregory Cranitch, Duc-tho Nguyen, Anne Nguyen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Worldwide there have been many instances where access to the personal and financial information of private individuals was gained by unauthorised personnel. To protect such information, in Australia, national privacy principles, which are embodied in legislation, specify how private-sector organisations should handle any personal information that they collect. In this study, the privacy policies of 18 Australian banks, as published on their own websites, are assessed against these principles. While the results are fairly reassuring from the bank customers' viewpoint, some areas of concern do remain, and these have important implications for providers, consumers, and regulators of e-finance services.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)389-405
Number of pages17
JournalInternational Journal of Electronic Finance
Volume1
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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Finance
Websites
Personnel
Personal information
Privacy
Financial information
Legislation
Privacy policies
E-finance
Private sector organizations
Web sites

Cite this

Cranitch, Gregory ; Nguyen, Duc-tho ; Nguyen, Anne. / Australian banks' approaches to privacy in an online world. In: International Journal of Electronic Finance. 2007 ; Vol. 1, No. 4. pp. 389-405.
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Australian banks' approaches to privacy in an online world. / Cranitch, Gregory; Nguyen, Duc-tho; Nguyen, Anne.

In: International Journal of Electronic Finance, Vol. 1, No. 4, 2007, p. 389-405.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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