Australian Army recruit training course length and recruit injury rates

Georgina M E Dawson, Rob Marc Orr, Ryan Broad

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOtherResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: A recruit will be required to complete a variety of strenuous physical activities during their training. These activities have the potential to cause a range of injuries. The aim of this study was to determine if the length of a recruit training program influenced injury rates.

Methods: Data were obtained form 267 Australian Regular Army recruits that attended Basic Recruit Training. Data were captured from two different Army recruit training course types, the 80-day Australian Recruit Course (ARC), and the 100-day Australian Soldier Course (ASC).

Results: Injury prevalence for ASC recruits was 17.8% and for ARC recruits 13.9%. Injury incidence for the ASC and ARC were 17.8 injuries/100 soldiers/100 days and 17.4 injuries/100 soldiers/100 days respectively. The majority of injuries for both courses were sprains and strains.

Discussion: ASC had a notably higher prevalence of injuries compared to ARC. However when considered against cohort size and exposure to training, both courses had similar injury incidence rates. This study observed much lower prevalence and incidence rates than those reported in previous literature on tactical athlete basic training. Injury types were however consistent with previous literature.

Conclusions and take home message: While potentially appearing to increase reported injuries, longer tactical athlete recruit training programs may not influence the incidence of injuries when cohort size and length of training are considered. The types of injuries suffered by Australian recruits undergoing training are commensurate with those of foreign defence services.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 17 May 2014
Event43rd Annual Sports Medicine Association Queensland State Conference - , Australia
Duration: 17 May 2014 → …

Conference

Conference43rd Annual Sports Medicine Association Queensland State Conference
CountryAustralia
Period17/05/14 → …

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Wounds and Injuries
Military Personnel
Incidence
Athletes
Sprains and Strains
Education
Exercise

Cite this

Dawson, G. M. E., Orr, R. M., & Broad, R. (2014). Australian Army recruit training course length and recruit injury rates. 43rd Annual Sports Medicine Association Queensland State Conference, Australia.
Dawson, Georgina M E ; Orr, Rob Marc ; Broad, Ryan. / Australian Army recruit training course length and recruit injury rates. 43rd Annual Sports Medicine Association Queensland State Conference, Australia.
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abstract = "Introduction: A recruit will be required to complete a variety of strenuous physical activities during their training. These activities have the potential to cause a range of injuries. The aim of this study was to determine if the length of a recruit training program influenced injury rates.Methods: Data were obtained form 267 Australian Regular Army recruits that attended Basic Recruit Training. Data were captured from two different Army recruit training course types, the 80-day Australian Recruit Course (ARC), and the 100-day Australian Soldier Course (ASC). Results: Injury prevalence for ASC recruits was 17.8{\%} and for ARC recruits 13.9{\%}. Injury incidence for the ASC and ARC were 17.8 injuries/100 soldiers/100 days and 17.4 injuries/100 soldiers/100 days respectively. The majority of injuries for both courses were sprains and strains.Discussion: ASC had a notably higher prevalence of injuries compared to ARC. However when considered against cohort size and exposure to training, both courses had similar injury incidence rates. This study observed much lower prevalence and incidence rates than those reported in previous literature on tactical athlete basic training. Injury types were however consistent with previous literature.Conclusions and take home message: While potentially appearing to increase reported injuries, longer tactical athlete recruit training programs may not influence the incidence of injuries when cohort size and length of training are considered. The types of injuries suffered by Australian recruits undergoing training are commensurate with those of foreign defence services.",
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Dawson, GME, Orr, RM & Broad, R 2014, 'Australian Army recruit training course length and recruit injury rates' 43rd Annual Sports Medicine Association Queensland State Conference, Australia, 17/05/14, .

Australian Army recruit training course length and recruit injury rates. / Dawson, Georgina M E; Orr, Rob Marc; Broad, Ryan.

2014. 43rd Annual Sports Medicine Association Queensland State Conference, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOtherResearchpeer-review

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AU - Broad, Ryan

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N2 - Introduction: A recruit will be required to complete a variety of strenuous physical activities during their training. These activities have the potential to cause a range of injuries. The aim of this study was to determine if the length of a recruit training program influenced injury rates.Methods: Data were obtained form 267 Australian Regular Army recruits that attended Basic Recruit Training. Data were captured from two different Army recruit training course types, the 80-day Australian Recruit Course (ARC), and the 100-day Australian Soldier Course (ASC). Results: Injury prevalence for ASC recruits was 17.8% and for ARC recruits 13.9%. Injury incidence for the ASC and ARC were 17.8 injuries/100 soldiers/100 days and 17.4 injuries/100 soldiers/100 days respectively. The majority of injuries for both courses were sprains and strains.Discussion: ASC had a notably higher prevalence of injuries compared to ARC. However when considered against cohort size and exposure to training, both courses had similar injury incidence rates. This study observed much lower prevalence and incidence rates than those reported in previous literature on tactical athlete basic training. Injury types were however consistent with previous literature.Conclusions and take home message: While potentially appearing to increase reported injuries, longer tactical athlete recruit training programs may not influence the incidence of injuries when cohort size and length of training are considered. The types of injuries suffered by Australian recruits undergoing training are commensurate with those of foreign defence services.

AB - Introduction: A recruit will be required to complete a variety of strenuous physical activities during their training. These activities have the potential to cause a range of injuries. The aim of this study was to determine if the length of a recruit training program influenced injury rates.Methods: Data were obtained form 267 Australian Regular Army recruits that attended Basic Recruit Training. Data were captured from two different Army recruit training course types, the 80-day Australian Recruit Course (ARC), and the 100-day Australian Soldier Course (ASC). Results: Injury prevalence for ASC recruits was 17.8% and for ARC recruits 13.9%. Injury incidence for the ASC and ARC were 17.8 injuries/100 soldiers/100 days and 17.4 injuries/100 soldiers/100 days respectively. The majority of injuries for both courses were sprains and strains.Discussion: ASC had a notably higher prevalence of injuries compared to ARC. However when considered against cohort size and exposure to training, both courses had similar injury incidence rates. This study observed much lower prevalence and incidence rates than those reported in previous literature on tactical athlete basic training. Injury types were however consistent with previous literature.Conclusions and take home message: While potentially appearing to increase reported injuries, longer tactical athlete recruit training programs may not influence the incidence of injuries when cohort size and length of training are considered. The types of injuries suffered by Australian recruits undergoing training are commensurate with those of foreign defence services.

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Dawson GME, Orr RM, Broad R. Australian Army recruit training course length and recruit injury rates. 2014. 43rd Annual Sports Medicine Association Queensland State Conference, Australia.