Attitude and knowledge of evidence-based practice (EBP) among doctors in Hong Kong: A questionnaire survey

Amy K.L. Chan*, Paul P. Glasziou, Cindy L.K. Lam

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To find out the attitude and knowledge of evidence-based practice (EBP) among doctors in Hong Kong. Design: Questionnaire survey of attitudes, perceived barriers and knowledge of EBP. Subjects: Three groups of doctors: (i) a random selection from all registered medical practitioners (N=276/3,000), (ii) members of the Hong Kong College of Family Physicians (N=422/1,488), and (iii) participants in EBP training courses (N=159). Main outcome measures: Attitude and barriers towards EBP, mean knowledge score in searching. Results: Most respondents agreed that EBP was useful in clinical practice (73%), few agreed that they would prefer to search the literature to find answers to clinical questions (46%). Most ranked "poverty of local evidence" as an important barrier (44%). Though few thought that "lack of knowledge and skills" was important (20%), the mean EBP knowledge score was below the pass-mark of 50% (43%, Cl 41-46%). Having internet access and training were predictive of better knowledge, while a more positive attitude was associated with regular searching. Conclusion: Respondents showed a positive attitude towards EBP, but knowledge of searching was barely satisfactory, especially for doctors in private practice. The low response rate precludes generalization but the results probably represent the most favourable scenario. Providing training, improving internet access, encouraging regular searching and alerting to pre-appraised evidence are likely to improve attitude and knowledge of EBP.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)128-135
Number of pages8
JournalHong Kong Practitioner
Volume30
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2008
Externally publishedYes

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