Associations of Total Protein or Animal Protein Intake and Animal Protein Sources with Risk of Kidney Stones: A Systematic Review and Dose-Response Meta-Analysis

Farzaneh Asoudeh, Sepide Talebi, Ahmad Jayedi, Wolfgang Marx, Mohammad Taghi Najafi, Hamed Mohammadi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

We conducted the present systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the association of total protein, animal protein and animal protein sources with risk of kidney stones in the general population. A literature search was performed on PubMed/Medline, Scopus and EMBASE up to July 2021. We assessed the credibility of evidence based on NutriGrade scoring system. A total of 14 prospective cohort studies were included. A positive association was observed between higher intake of non-dairy animal protein (RR: 1.11, 95%CI: 1.03, 1.20; I2 = 0%, n = 4), total meat and meat products (RR: 1.22, 95%CI: 1.09, 1.38; I2 = 13%, n = 3), and processed meat (RR: 1.29, 95%CI: 1.10, 1.51; I2 = 0%, n = 2) with risk of kidney stones. There was an inverse association between higher intake of dairy protein and risk of kidney stones (RR: 0.91, 95%CI: 0.84, 0.99; I2 = 0%, n = 4). Moreover, each 100 gram increment of red meat intake was significantly associated with increased risk of kidney stones (RR: 1.39, 95% CI: 1.13, 1.71). According to NutriGrade scoring system, the credibility of evidence for most of the exposures was rated as low. We found some kind of publication bias in the association of animal protein intake and risk of kidney stones, according to Egger's and Begg's tests. In the sensitivity analysis of processed meat as well as dairy consumption with risk of kidney stones, we observed in each individual analysis, one study changed the overall estimate. Further observational studies are needed to confirm present results.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAdvances in Nutrition
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 18 Feb 2022
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Associations of Total Protein or Animal Protein Intake and Animal Protein Sources with Risk of Kidney Stones: A Systematic Review and Dose-Response Meta-Analysis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this