Associations of muscular power and endurance to change of direction speed under two loading conditions among female police officers

Jacob Bone, Whitney Tramel, Filip Kukic, Alexander Čvorović, Dunja Janković, Nenad Koropanovski, Robert G. Lockie, Rob Marc Orr, Jay Dawes

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Abstract

Purpose: Change of direction speed (CODS) is essential for law enforcement officers during many occupational tasks, such as when pursuing a suspect. Typically, these tasks are performed while in uniform and while wearing duty equipment weighing up to an average of 10kg . It could be expected that greater strength and power would contribute to more effective task performance in loaded conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between lower-body power and upper body muscular strength-endurance to a CODS task both with and without occupational load. Methods: Forty-four (n=44, age: 27.09 ±7.25 yrs., Ht: 166.48 ± 6.88 cm; Wt.: 69.92 ± 13.69 kg) female police officers performed a standing long jump (SLJ), modified push-ups (MPU), and time to complete the Illinois Agility Test both unloaded (IAT) and while wearing a 10 kg vest (IATL). Completion times for the IAT and IATL were recorded to the nearest .01 sec. Results: The results revealed significant moderate relationships between SLJ and IAT (r =-0.586, p < .001), as well as between SLJ and IATL (r =-0.567, p < .001). A low, but significant, relationship was also found between MPU and IATL (r =-377, p =.012). No significant relationship was observed between IAT and MPU (Table 1). Conclusions: Female officers with greater lower-body power and upper-body strength endurance may have an advantage when performing the IATL; however, the MPU does not appear to significantly impact in the IAT. These results suggest that as occupational load increases, especially around the trunk, greater upper-body muscular strength and endurance become more important when performing essential job tasks that require short distance sprinting and direction changes (i.e., foot pursuits, seeking cover).
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2019
EventRocky Mountain American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting 2019 - Denver, United States
Duration: 1 Mar 20192 Mar 2019
https://www.acsm.org/acsm-membership/regional-chapters/acsm-chapters/rocky-mountain/annual-meeting

Conference

ConferenceRocky Mountain American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting 2019
Abbreviated titleRMACSM
CountryUnited States
CityDenver
Period1/03/192/03/19
Internet address

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Police
Task Performance and Analysis
Foot
Equipment and Supplies
Direction compound
Power (Psychology)

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Bone, J., Tramel, W., Kukic, F., Čvorović, A., Janković, D., Koropanovski, N., ... Dawes, J. (2019). Associations of muscular power and endurance to change of direction speed under two loading conditions among female police officers. Abstract from Rocky Mountain American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting 2019, Denver, United States.
Bone, Jacob ; Tramel, Whitney ; Kukic, Filip ; Čvorović, Alexander ; Janković, Dunja ; Koropanovski, Nenad ; Lockie, Robert G. ; Orr, Rob Marc ; Dawes, Jay. / Associations of muscular power and endurance to change of direction speed under two loading conditions among female police officers. Abstract from Rocky Mountain American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting 2019, Denver, United States.
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abstract = "Purpose: Change of direction speed (CODS) is essential for law enforcement officers during many occupational tasks, such as when pursuing a suspect. Typically, these tasks are performed while in uniform and while wearing duty equipment weighing up to an average of 10kg . It could be expected that greater strength and power would contribute to more effective task performance in loaded conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between lower-body power and upper body muscular strength-endurance to a CODS task both with and without occupational load. Methods: Forty-four (n=44, age: 27.09 ±7.25 yrs., Ht: 166.48 ± 6.88 cm; Wt.: 69.92 ± 13.69 kg) female police officers performed a standing long jump (SLJ), modified push-ups (MPU), and time to complete the Illinois Agility Test both unloaded (IAT) and while wearing a 10 kg vest (IATL). Completion times for the IAT and IATL were recorded to the nearest .01 sec. Results: The results revealed significant moderate relationships between SLJ and IAT (r =-0.586, p < .001), as well as between SLJ and IATL (r =-0.567, p < .001). A low, but significant, relationship was also found between MPU and IATL (r =-377, p =.012). No significant relationship was observed between IAT and MPU (Table 1). Conclusions: Female officers with greater lower-body power and upper-body strength endurance may have an advantage when performing the IATL; however, the MPU does not appear to significantly impact in the IAT. These results suggest that as occupational load increases, especially around the trunk, greater upper-body muscular strength and endurance become more important when performing essential job tasks that require short distance sprinting and direction changes (i.e., foot pursuits, seeking cover).",
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Bone, J, Tramel, W, Kukic, F, Čvorović, A, Janković, D, Koropanovski, N, Lockie, RG, Orr, RM & Dawes, J 2019, 'Associations of muscular power and endurance to change of direction speed under two loading conditions among female police officers' Rocky Mountain American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting 2019, Denver, United States, 1/03/19 - 2/03/19, .

Associations of muscular power and endurance to change of direction speed under two loading conditions among female police officers. / Bone, Jacob; Tramel, Whitney; Kukic, Filip; Čvorović, Alexander ; Janković, Dunja ; Koropanovski, Nenad; Lockie, Robert G.; Orr, Rob Marc; Dawes, Jay.

2019. Abstract from Rocky Mountain American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting 2019, Denver, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - Associations of muscular power and endurance to change of direction speed under two loading conditions among female police officers

AU - Bone, Jacob

AU - Tramel, Whitney

AU - Kukic, Filip

AU - Čvorović, Alexander

AU - Janković, Dunja

AU - Koropanovski, Nenad

AU - Lockie, Robert G.

AU - Orr, Rob Marc

AU - Dawes, Jay

PY - 2019/3/1

Y1 - 2019/3/1

N2 - Purpose: Change of direction speed (CODS) is essential for law enforcement officers during many occupational tasks, such as when pursuing a suspect. Typically, these tasks are performed while in uniform and while wearing duty equipment weighing up to an average of 10kg . It could be expected that greater strength and power would contribute to more effective task performance in loaded conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between lower-body power and upper body muscular strength-endurance to a CODS task both with and without occupational load. Methods: Forty-four (n=44, age: 27.09 ±7.25 yrs., Ht: 166.48 ± 6.88 cm; Wt.: 69.92 ± 13.69 kg) female police officers performed a standing long jump (SLJ), modified push-ups (MPU), and time to complete the Illinois Agility Test both unloaded (IAT) and while wearing a 10 kg vest (IATL). Completion times for the IAT and IATL were recorded to the nearest .01 sec. Results: The results revealed significant moderate relationships between SLJ and IAT (r =-0.586, p < .001), as well as between SLJ and IATL (r =-0.567, p < .001). A low, but significant, relationship was also found between MPU and IATL (r =-377, p =.012). No significant relationship was observed between IAT and MPU (Table 1). Conclusions: Female officers with greater lower-body power and upper-body strength endurance may have an advantage when performing the IATL; however, the MPU does not appear to significantly impact in the IAT. These results suggest that as occupational load increases, especially around the trunk, greater upper-body muscular strength and endurance become more important when performing essential job tasks that require short distance sprinting and direction changes (i.e., foot pursuits, seeking cover).

AB - Purpose: Change of direction speed (CODS) is essential for law enforcement officers during many occupational tasks, such as when pursuing a suspect. Typically, these tasks are performed while in uniform and while wearing duty equipment weighing up to an average of 10kg . It could be expected that greater strength and power would contribute to more effective task performance in loaded conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between lower-body power and upper body muscular strength-endurance to a CODS task both with and without occupational load. Methods: Forty-four (n=44, age: 27.09 ±7.25 yrs., Ht: 166.48 ± 6.88 cm; Wt.: 69.92 ± 13.69 kg) female police officers performed a standing long jump (SLJ), modified push-ups (MPU), and time to complete the Illinois Agility Test both unloaded (IAT) and while wearing a 10 kg vest (IATL). Completion times for the IAT and IATL were recorded to the nearest .01 sec. Results: The results revealed significant moderate relationships between SLJ and IAT (r =-0.586, p < .001), as well as between SLJ and IATL (r =-0.567, p < .001). A low, but significant, relationship was also found between MPU and IATL (r =-377, p =.012). No significant relationship was observed between IAT and MPU (Table 1). Conclusions: Female officers with greater lower-body power and upper-body strength endurance may have an advantage when performing the IATL; however, the MPU does not appear to significantly impact in the IAT. These results suggest that as occupational load increases, especially around the trunk, greater upper-body muscular strength and endurance become more important when performing essential job tasks that require short distance sprinting and direction changes (i.e., foot pursuits, seeking cover).

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M3 - Abstract

ER -

Bone J, Tramel W, Kukic F, Čvorović A, Janković D, Koropanovski N et al. Associations of muscular power and endurance to change of direction speed under two loading conditions among female police officers. 2019. Abstract from Rocky Mountain American College of Sports Medicine Annual Meeting 2019, Denver, United States.