Associations Between Motor Proficiency and Academic Performance in Year 1 School Children: A Cross-Sectional Study

Kirstin Macdonald, Nikki Milne, Rob Marc Orr, Rodney R Pope

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Aim: To examine the relationship between motor proficiency and academic performance in mathematics and reading in Year 1 children.Design: A cross-sectional study, examining the relationship between motor proficiency and academic performance.Method: Fifty-five Year 1 children (boys: n = 25, girls: n = 30; mean age: 6.79  0.42 years) from two primary schools in New South Wales participated. Motor proficiency and academic performance in mathematics and reading were assessed using the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (2nd Edition) and the Weschler Individual Achievement Test II (Australian Edition) respectively. Pearson correlation and multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine relationships between these variables. Results: A moderate association was found between total motor proficiency and mathematical ability (r = 0.455, p < 0.001), along with a weak correlation between total motor proficiency and reading ability (r = 0.271, p = 0.047). Backward multiple regressions revealed that in the presence of fine manual control, manual coordination, body coordination and strength and agility percentile ranks, fine manual control remained the only significant predictor of mathematics and reading ability, accounting for 28.2% (SEE: 23.99) and 18.3% (SEE: 29.17) of the variance in mathematics and reading ability respectively. Conclusion: Significant relationships exist between motor proficiency and academic performance, particularly in mathematics. Fine motor skills appear to be more strongly associated with moderate predictive relationships found between fine manual control and mathematics and reading ability.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 17 Oct 2017
EventAPA National Physiotherapy Conference MOMENTUM 2017 - Cockle Bay Wharf, Sydney, Australia
Duration: 19 Oct 201721 Oct 2017

Conference

ConferenceAPA National Physiotherapy Conference MOMENTUM 2017
Abbreviated titleAPA
CountryAustralia
CitySydney
Period19/10/1721/10/17
OtherAustralian Physiotherapy Association (APA) Momentum 2017 is organized by Australian Physiotherapy Association (APA) and would be held during Oct 19 - 21, 2017 at Cockle Bay Wharf, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. The target audience for this medical meeting basically for Physicians.

Physiotherapists have always been innovators in health, pushing forward to deliver excellent patient outcomes.

As the healthcare landscape becomes more competitive, it is important to keep moving with the changes. MOMENTUM 2017, the APA national conference will empower you to be part of the future of Australian and global physiotherapy.

Join with the rest of the profession to hear from leaders in physiotherapy about the latest clinical research. Meet the people you need to know to help you grow in your profession and discover the newest innovations.

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Mathematics
Aptitude
Reading
Cross-Sectional Studies
New South Wales
Motor Skills
Regression Analysis

Cite this

Macdonald, K., Milne, N., Orr, R. M., & Pope, R. R. (2017). Associations Between Motor Proficiency and Academic Performance in Year 1 School Children: A Cross-Sectional Study. Abstract from APA National Physiotherapy Conference MOMENTUM 2017, Sydney, Australia.
Macdonald, Kirstin ; Milne, Nikki ; Orr, Rob Marc ; Pope, Rodney R. / Associations Between Motor Proficiency and Academic Performance in Year 1 School Children : A Cross-Sectional Study. Abstract from APA National Physiotherapy Conference MOMENTUM 2017, Sydney, Australia.
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abstract = "Aim: To examine the relationship between motor proficiency and academic performance in mathematics and reading in Year 1 children.Design: A cross-sectional study, examining the relationship between motor proficiency and academic performance.Method: Fifty-five Year 1 children (boys: n = 25, girls: n = 30; mean age: 6.79  0.42 years) from two primary schools in New South Wales participated. Motor proficiency and academic performance in mathematics and reading were assessed using the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (2nd Edition) and the Weschler Individual Achievement Test II (Australian Edition) respectively. Pearson correlation and multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine relationships between these variables. Results: A moderate association was found between total motor proficiency and mathematical ability (r = 0.455, p < 0.001), along with a weak correlation between total motor proficiency and reading ability (r = 0.271, p = 0.047). Backward multiple regressions revealed that in the presence of fine manual control, manual coordination, body coordination and strength and agility percentile ranks, fine manual control remained the only significant predictor of mathematics and reading ability, accounting for 28.2{\%} (SEE: 23.99) and 18.3{\%} (SEE: 29.17) of the variance in mathematics and reading ability respectively. Conclusion: Significant relationships exist between motor proficiency and academic performance, particularly in mathematics. Fine motor skills appear to be more strongly associated with moderate predictive relationships found between fine manual control and mathematics and reading ability.",
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Macdonald, K, Milne, N, Orr, RM & Pope, RR 2017, 'Associations Between Motor Proficiency and Academic Performance in Year 1 School Children: A Cross-Sectional Study' APA National Physiotherapy Conference MOMENTUM 2017, Sydney, Australia, 19/10/17 - 21/10/17, .

Associations Between Motor Proficiency and Academic Performance in Year 1 School Children : A Cross-Sectional Study. / Macdonald, Kirstin; Milne, Nikki; Orr, Rob Marc; Pope, Rodney R.

2017. Abstract from APA National Physiotherapy Conference MOMENTUM 2017, Sydney, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - Associations Between Motor Proficiency and Academic Performance in Year 1 School Children

T2 - A Cross-Sectional Study

AU - Macdonald, Kirstin

AU - Milne, Nikki

AU - Orr, Rob Marc

AU - Pope, Rodney R

PY - 2017/10/17

Y1 - 2017/10/17

N2 - Aim: To examine the relationship between motor proficiency and academic performance in mathematics and reading in Year 1 children.Design: A cross-sectional study, examining the relationship between motor proficiency and academic performance.Method: Fifty-five Year 1 children (boys: n = 25, girls: n = 30; mean age: 6.79  0.42 years) from two primary schools in New South Wales participated. Motor proficiency and academic performance in mathematics and reading were assessed using the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (2nd Edition) and the Weschler Individual Achievement Test II (Australian Edition) respectively. Pearson correlation and multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine relationships between these variables. Results: A moderate association was found between total motor proficiency and mathematical ability (r = 0.455, p < 0.001), along with a weak correlation between total motor proficiency and reading ability (r = 0.271, p = 0.047). Backward multiple regressions revealed that in the presence of fine manual control, manual coordination, body coordination and strength and agility percentile ranks, fine manual control remained the only significant predictor of mathematics and reading ability, accounting for 28.2% (SEE: 23.99) and 18.3% (SEE: 29.17) of the variance in mathematics and reading ability respectively. Conclusion: Significant relationships exist between motor proficiency and academic performance, particularly in mathematics. Fine motor skills appear to be more strongly associated with moderate predictive relationships found between fine manual control and mathematics and reading ability.

AB - Aim: To examine the relationship between motor proficiency and academic performance in mathematics and reading in Year 1 children.Design: A cross-sectional study, examining the relationship between motor proficiency and academic performance.Method: Fifty-five Year 1 children (boys: n = 25, girls: n = 30; mean age: 6.79  0.42 years) from two primary schools in New South Wales participated. Motor proficiency and academic performance in mathematics and reading were assessed using the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (2nd Edition) and the Weschler Individual Achievement Test II (Australian Edition) respectively. Pearson correlation and multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine relationships between these variables. Results: A moderate association was found between total motor proficiency and mathematical ability (r = 0.455, p < 0.001), along with a weak correlation between total motor proficiency and reading ability (r = 0.271, p = 0.047). Backward multiple regressions revealed that in the presence of fine manual control, manual coordination, body coordination and strength and agility percentile ranks, fine manual control remained the only significant predictor of mathematics and reading ability, accounting for 28.2% (SEE: 23.99) and 18.3% (SEE: 29.17) of the variance in mathematics and reading ability respectively. Conclusion: Significant relationships exist between motor proficiency and academic performance, particularly in mathematics. Fine motor skills appear to be more strongly associated with moderate predictive relationships found between fine manual control and mathematics and reading ability.

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Macdonald K, Milne N, Orr RM, Pope RR. Associations Between Motor Proficiency and Academic Performance in Year 1 School Children: A Cross-Sectional Study. 2017. Abstract from APA National Physiotherapy Conference MOMENTUM 2017, Sydney, Australia.