Association between isometric leg-back strength and lower body power in law enforcement officers

Jacob Bone, Brandon Stone, Erika Hernandez, Robert G. Lockie, Rob Marc Orr, Charles Kornhauser, Ryan Holmes, Jay Dawes

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Law enforcement personnel must possess a high level of physical capabilities that often include dynamic movements which are outcomes of both lower body strength and power. These qualities are often expressed in athletic environments where significant relationships have been observed between dynamic lower-body strength and power. Thus, it’s speculated that similar relationships may exist between these measures in law enforcement personnel. PURPOSE: To determine if significant relationships exist between lower body strength and power in law enforcement personnel. METHODS: Archival data from a US law enforcement agency (n=595, age: 39.2 + 8.1 years, Ht: 179.9 + 7.4 cm, Body mass: 92.54 + 16.2 kg) were used in the present study. Lower body strength (leg and back) were assessed via a lower body dynamometer in both absolute; (LBDa) and relative (LBDr) body mass. Vertical jump height (VJ) and body mass (kg) were used to determine estimated power output (PAPw) via Sayer’s equation (Sayers et al. 1991). Pearson product moment correlation (p < 0.05) was performed to determine the relationship between LDBa, LBDr, VJ and PAPw. RESULTS: Significant relationships were observed between LBDa and VJ (r= .403, p = .0001), LBDa and PAPw (r = .605, p = .0001) and LBDr and VJ ( r= .564, p = .0001) whereas no relationship was observed between LBDr and PAPw (r = -.049, p = .232). CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrates that absolute lower body strength and power are significantly related, both in terms of vertical jump and estimated power output while relative lower body strength was related to vertical jump but not estimated power output. These suggest that law enforcement personnel require similar strength and power relationships as seen within athletic populations.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 10 Jul 2019
Event42nd National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) National Conference and Exhibition - Washington Marriott Wardman Park, Washington DC, United States
Duration: 10 Jul 201913 Jul 2019

Conference

Conference42nd National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) National Conference and Exhibition
Abbreviated titleNSCA
CountryUnited States
CityWashington DC
Period10/07/1913/07/19
OtherNational Strength and Conditioning Association National Conference National Strength and Conditioning Association National Conference. The NSCA advances the profession by supporting strength and conditioning professionals devoted to helping others discover and maximize their strengths. We disseminate research-based knowledge and its practical application by offering industry-leading certifications, research journals, career development services, and continuing education opportunities.

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Law Enforcement
Police
Leg
Sports
Body Height
Population

Cite this

Bone, J., Stone, B., Hernandez, E., Lockie, R. G., Orr, R. M., Kornhauser, C., ... Dawes, J. (2019). Association between isometric leg-back strength and lower body power in law enforcement officers. Poster session presented at 42nd National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) National Conference and Exhibition, Washington DC, United States.
Bone, Jacob ; Stone, Brandon ; Hernandez, Erika ; Lockie, Robert G. ; Orr, Rob Marc ; Kornhauser, Charles ; Holmes, Ryan ; Dawes, Jay. / Association between isometric leg-back strength and lower body power in law enforcement officers. Poster session presented at 42nd National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) National Conference and Exhibition, Washington DC, United States.
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title = "Association between isometric leg-back strength and lower body power in law enforcement officers",
abstract = "Law enforcement personnel must possess a high level of physical capabilities that often include dynamic movements which are outcomes of both lower body strength and power. These qualities are often expressed in athletic environments where significant relationships have been observed between dynamic lower-body strength and power. Thus, it’s speculated that similar relationships may exist between these measures in law enforcement personnel. PURPOSE: To determine if significant relationships exist between lower body strength and power in law enforcement personnel. METHODS: Archival data from a US law enforcement agency (n=595, age: 39.2 + 8.1 years, Ht: 179.9 + 7.4 cm, Body mass: 92.54 + 16.2 kg) were used in the present study. Lower body strength (leg and back) were assessed via a lower body dynamometer in both absolute; (LBDa) and relative (LBDr) body mass. Vertical jump height (VJ) and body mass (kg) were used to determine estimated power output (PAPw) via Sayer’s equation (Sayers et al. 1991). Pearson product moment correlation (p < 0.05) was performed to determine the relationship between LDBa, LBDr, VJ and PAPw. RESULTS: Significant relationships were observed between LBDa and VJ (r= .403, p = .0001), LBDa and PAPw (r = .605, p = .0001) and LBDr and VJ ( r= .564, p = .0001) whereas no relationship was observed between LBDr and PAPw (r = -.049, p = .232). CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrates that absolute lower body strength and power are significantly related, both in terms of vertical jump and estimated power output while relative lower body strength was related to vertical jump but not estimated power output. These suggest that law enforcement personnel require similar strength and power relationships as seen within athletic populations.",
author = "Jacob Bone and Brandon Stone and Erika Hernandez and Lockie, {Robert G.} and Orr, {Rob Marc} and Charles Kornhauser and Ryan Holmes and Jay Dawes",
year = "2019",
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language = "English",
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Bone, J, Stone, B, Hernandez, E, Lockie, RG, Orr, RM, Kornhauser, C, Holmes, R & Dawes, J 2019, 'Association between isometric leg-back strength and lower body power in law enforcement officers' 42nd National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) National Conference and Exhibition, Washington DC, United States, 10/07/19 - 13/07/19, .

Association between isometric leg-back strength and lower body power in law enforcement officers. / Bone, Jacob; Stone, Brandon; Hernandez, Erika; Lockie, Robert G.; Orr, Rob Marc; Kornhauser, Charles; Holmes, Ryan; Dawes, Jay.

2019. Poster session presented at 42nd National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) National Conference and Exhibition, Washington DC, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - Association between isometric leg-back strength and lower body power in law enforcement officers

AU - Bone, Jacob

AU - Stone, Brandon

AU - Hernandez, Erika

AU - Lockie, Robert G.

AU - Orr, Rob Marc

AU - Kornhauser, Charles

AU - Holmes, Ryan

AU - Dawes, Jay

PY - 2019/7/10

Y1 - 2019/7/10

N2 - Law enforcement personnel must possess a high level of physical capabilities that often include dynamic movements which are outcomes of both lower body strength and power. These qualities are often expressed in athletic environments where significant relationships have been observed between dynamic lower-body strength and power. Thus, it’s speculated that similar relationships may exist between these measures in law enforcement personnel. PURPOSE: To determine if significant relationships exist between lower body strength and power in law enforcement personnel. METHODS: Archival data from a US law enforcement agency (n=595, age: 39.2 + 8.1 years, Ht: 179.9 + 7.4 cm, Body mass: 92.54 + 16.2 kg) were used in the present study. Lower body strength (leg and back) were assessed via a lower body dynamometer in both absolute; (LBDa) and relative (LBDr) body mass. Vertical jump height (VJ) and body mass (kg) were used to determine estimated power output (PAPw) via Sayer’s equation (Sayers et al. 1991). Pearson product moment correlation (p < 0.05) was performed to determine the relationship between LDBa, LBDr, VJ and PAPw. RESULTS: Significant relationships were observed between LBDa and VJ (r= .403, p = .0001), LBDa and PAPw (r = .605, p = .0001) and LBDr and VJ ( r= .564, p = .0001) whereas no relationship was observed between LBDr and PAPw (r = -.049, p = .232). CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrates that absolute lower body strength and power are significantly related, both in terms of vertical jump and estimated power output while relative lower body strength was related to vertical jump but not estimated power output. These suggest that law enforcement personnel require similar strength and power relationships as seen within athletic populations.

AB - Law enforcement personnel must possess a high level of physical capabilities that often include dynamic movements which are outcomes of both lower body strength and power. These qualities are often expressed in athletic environments where significant relationships have been observed between dynamic lower-body strength and power. Thus, it’s speculated that similar relationships may exist between these measures in law enforcement personnel. PURPOSE: To determine if significant relationships exist between lower body strength and power in law enforcement personnel. METHODS: Archival data from a US law enforcement agency (n=595, age: 39.2 + 8.1 years, Ht: 179.9 + 7.4 cm, Body mass: 92.54 + 16.2 kg) were used in the present study. Lower body strength (leg and back) were assessed via a lower body dynamometer in both absolute; (LBDa) and relative (LBDr) body mass. Vertical jump height (VJ) and body mass (kg) were used to determine estimated power output (PAPw) via Sayer’s equation (Sayers et al. 1991). Pearson product moment correlation (p < 0.05) was performed to determine the relationship between LDBa, LBDr, VJ and PAPw. RESULTS: Significant relationships were observed between LBDa and VJ (r= .403, p = .0001), LBDa and PAPw (r = .605, p = .0001) and LBDr and VJ ( r= .564, p = .0001) whereas no relationship was observed between LBDr and PAPw (r = -.049, p = .232). CONCLUSIONS: The present study demonstrates that absolute lower body strength and power are significantly related, both in terms of vertical jump and estimated power output while relative lower body strength was related to vertical jump but not estimated power output. These suggest that law enforcement personnel require similar strength and power relationships as seen within athletic populations.

M3 - Poster

ER -

Bone J, Stone B, Hernandez E, Lockie RG, Orr RM, Kornhauser C et al. Association between isometric leg-back strength and lower body power in law enforcement officers. 2019. Poster session presented at 42nd National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) National Conference and Exhibition, Washington DC, United States.