Art in a modern era of health professions education: where have we been and where should we go with moulage?

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractEducationpeer-review

Abstract

Intro
Moulage is an art that dates back to the 17th century. A French word to describe the use of moulds to create wax replicas of illness and injury, it was an often-clandestine activity to preserve anatomical replicas to share learnings amongst physicians. Now stored in musea around the world, the word moulage now encompasses the use of special effects makeup techniques and prosthetics to replicate illness and trauma in health professions education. Despite its long history and its widespread use in simulation, there has been very little research to inform the theoretical and practical application of moulage.
The literature on moulage heavily focuses on dermatology and trauma simulations, with a small focus on wound management or other ongoing cares. In this Personally Arranged Learning Session (PeArLS), we will explore the underpinning theories of moulage in health professions education and the future of moulage in health professions education. We will cover the following key questions:

- Where is moulage utilised across the health professions education spectrum?
- What are the barriers to the use of moulage in health professions education?
- What are the enablers for the use of moulage in health professions education?
- What are the key areas for growth in moulage research and scholarship?

Original languageEnglish
PagesPeArLs 3B
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2021
EventANZAHPE Conference/Festival 2021: Moving Forward in Ambiguity - online, Australia
Duration: 12 Jul 202119 Jul 2021
https://eventstudio.eventsair.com/anzahpe-2021/

Conference

ConferenceANZAHPE Conference/Festival 2021
CountryAustralia
Period12/07/2119/07/21
Internet address

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