Are gerontological nurses ready for the expression of sexuality by individuals with dementia?

Cindy Jones, Wendy Moyle

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

Abstract

[Extract] Education prepares gerontological nurses to assess, treat, and care for older adults and their families. However, it is not clear whether they are prepared for what has been described by the media as a future tsunami of older adults with dementia (Russell, 2015). In 2015, approximately 46.8 million individuals 60 and older had dementia and, alongside population aging, this figure is expected to double every 20 years (Alzheimer's Disease International, 2015). With no imminent cure in sight, a significant nursing focus has been on improving quality of life of individuals with dementia through a person-centered approach to symptom management within a supportive living environment. However, an often-neglected aspect of dementia care, and one that gerontological nurses may be less prepared for, is the sexual health and expression of sexuality by older adults, as ageist perceptions continue to promote older adults as being asexual (Bauer, Haesler, & Fetherstonhaugh, 2016).
LanguageEnglish
Pages2-4
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Gerontological Nursing
Volume44
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sexuality
Dementia
Nurses
Tsunamis
Reproductive Health
Alzheimer Disease
Nursing
Quality of Life
Education
Population

Cite this

@article{eb1e9ceaae8d4593a2e7b690e1d56bd8,
title = "Are gerontological nurses ready for the expression of sexuality by individuals with dementia?",
abstract = "[Extract] Education prepares gerontological nurses to assess, treat, and care for older adults and their families. However, it is not clear whether they are prepared for what has been described by the media as a future tsunami of older adults with dementia (Russell, 2015). In 2015, approximately 46.8 million individuals 60 and older had dementia and, alongside population aging, this figure is expected to double every 20 years (Alzheimer's Disease International, 2015). With no imminent cure in sight, a significant nursing focus has been on improving quality of life of individuals with dementia through a person-centered approach to symptom management within a supportive living environment. However, an often-neglected aspect of dementia care, and one that gerontological nurses may be less prepared for, is the sexual health and expression of sexuality by older adults, as ageist perceptions continue to promote older adults as being asexual (Bauer, Haesler, & Fetherstonhaugh, 2016).",
author = "Cindy Jones and Wendy Moyle",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3928/00989134-20180413-01",
language = "English",
volume = "44",
pages = "2--4",
journal = "Journal of Gerontological Nursing",
issn = "0098-9134",
publisher = "Slack Incorporated",
number = "5",

}

Are gerontological nurses ready for the expression of sexuality by individuals with dementia? / Jones, Cindy; Moyle, Wendy.

In: Journal of Gerontological Nursing, Vol. 44, No. 5, 01.05.2018, p. 2-4.

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

TY - JOUR

T1 - Are gerontological nurses ready for the expression of sexuality by individuals with dementia?

AU - Jones, Cindy

AU - Moyle, Wendy

PY - 2018/5/1

Y1 - 2018/5/1

N2 - [Extract] Education prepares gerontological nurses to assess, treat, and care for older adults and their families. However, it is not clear whether they are prepared for what has been described by the media as a future tsunami of older adults with dementia (Russell, 2015). In 2015, approximately 46.8 million individuals 60 and older had dementia and, alongside population aging, this figure is expected to double every 20 years (Alzheimer's Disease International, 2015). With no imminent cure in sight, a significant nursing focus has been on improving quality of life of individuals with dementia through a person-centered approach to symptom management within a supportive living environment. However, an often-neglected aspect of dementia care, and one that gerontological nurses may be less prepared for, is the sexual health and expression of sexuality by older adults, as ageist perceptions continue to promote older adults as being asexual (Bauer, Haesler, & Fetherstonhaugh, 2016).

AB - [Extract] Education prepares gerontological nurses to assess, treat, and care for older adults and their families. However, it is not clear whether they are prepared for what has been described by the media as a future tsunami of older adults with dementia (Russell, 2015). In 2015, approximately 46.8 million individuals 60 and older had dementia and, alongside population aging, this figure is expected to double every 20 years (Alzheimer's Disease International, 2015). With no imminent cure in sight, a significant nursing focus has been on improving quality of life of individuals with dementia through a person-centered approach to symptom management within a supportive living environment. However, an often-neglected aspect of dementia care, and one that gerontological nurses may be less prepared for, is the sexual health and expression of sexuality by older adults, as ageist perceptions continue to promote older adults as being asexual (Bauer, Haesler, & Fetherstonhaugh, 2016).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85046273934&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3928/00989134-20180413-01

DO - 10.3928/00989134-20180413-01

M3 - Editorial

VL - 44

SP - 2

EP - 4

JO - Journal of Gerontological Nursing

T2 - Journal of Gerontological Nursing

JF - Journal of Gerontological Nursing

SN - 0098-9134

IS - 5

ER -