Aquariums are for children and creeps

Research output: Other contributionResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This story was originally published in Day One, a weekly literary journal dedicated to short fiction and poetry from emerging writers.

Extract: Aquariums are for children and creeps. And, at twenty-nine and pretty, Nina was popular with both. She had strawberry cheeks, olive skin, apple eyes, and a caramel smile. Good enough to eat. Or kiss. Or stare at longingly. And stare they did. Especially Doug. It wasn’t like he had a lot else to do.
Doug was excited. It was hard to tell, because his jowls sagged at the same dejected angle whatever his emotions, and his dumpy body had trouble expressing passion. But in his heart he was excited. He could see the clock through the receptionists’ office door, and it was nearly 9:00 a.m. Only a few more minutes.

Nina arrived at 8:56. She was running late, as usual, but Doug didn’t mind. She always arrived through the staff entrance out the side, so he never saw her come in. Only her hurried ghost in the window as she threw her bag under the counter, swept back her hair, and tried in vain to smooth her unironed uniform across that little body of hers. Christ, she was good-looking. Doug knew he didn’t have a chance, but—well, a guy could look.

The clock ticked over. 8:58. Not long now.
Original languageEnglish
TypeCreative works
Media of outputTextual work
PublisherStoryFront
Number of pages23
Place of PublicationSeattle
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Creep
Clock
Emotion
Christ
Staff
Literary Journals
Eat
Short Fiction
Ghost
Kiss
Olive
Poetry
Bag
Writer
Passion

Cite this

Graham, Caroline. / Aquariums are for children and creeps. 2015. Seattle : StoryFront 23 p.
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title = "Aquariums are for children and creeps",
abstract = "This story was originally published in Day One, a weekly literary journal dedicated to short fiction and poetry from emerging writers.Extract: Aquariums are for children and creeps. And, at twenty-nine and pretty, Nina was popular with both. She had strawberry cheeks, olive skin, apple eyes, and a caramel smile. Good enough to eat. Or kiss. Or stare at longingly. And stare they did. Especially Doug. It wasn’t like he had a lot else to do.Doug was excited. It was hard to tell, because his jowls sagged at the same dejected angle whatever his emotions, and his dumpy body had trouble expressing passion. But in his heart he was excited. He could see the clock through the receptionists’ office door, and it was nearly 9:00 a.m. Only a few more minutes.Nina arrived at 8:56. She was running late, as usual, but Doug didn’t mind. She always arrived through the staff entrance out the side, so he never saw her come in. Only her hurried ghost in the window as she threw her bag under the counter, swept back her hair, and tried in vain to smooth her unironed uniform across that little body of hers. Christ, she was good-looking. Doug knew he didn’t have a chance, but—well, a guy could look.The clock ticked over. 8:58. Not long now.",
author = "Caroline Graham",
year = "2015",
language = "English",
publisher = "StoryFront",
type = "Other",

}

Aquariums are for children and creeps. / Graham, Caroline.

23 p. Seattle : StoryFront . 2015, Creative works.

Research output: Other contributionResearchpeer-review

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N2 - This story was originally published in Day One, a weekly literary journal dedicated to short fiction and poetry from emerging writers.Extract: Aquariums are for children and creeps. And, at twenty-nine and pretty, Nina was popular with both. She had strawberry cheeks, olive skin, apple eyes, and a caramel smile. Good enough to eat. Or kiss. Or stare at longingly. And stare they did. Especially Doug. It wasn’t like he had a lot else to do.Doug was excited. It was hard to tell, because his jowls sagged at the same dejected angle whatever his emotions, and his dumpy body had trouble expressing passion. But in his heart he was excited. He could see the clock through the receptionists’ office door, and it was nearly 9:00 a.m. Only a few more minutes.Nina arrived at 8:56. She was running late, as usual, but Doug didn’t mind. She always arrived through the staff entrance out the side, so he never saw her come in. Only her hurried ghost in the window as she threw her bag under the counter, swept back her hair, and tried in vain to smooth her unironed uniform across that little body of hers. Christ, she was good-looking. Doug knew he didn’t have a chance, but—well, a guy could look.The clock ticked over. 8:58. Not long now.

AB - This story was originally published in Day One, a weekly literary journal dedicated to short fiction and poetry from emerging writers.Extract: Aquariums are for children and creeps. And, at twenty-nine and pretty, Nina was popular with both. She had strawberry cheeks, olive skin, apple eyes, and a caramel smile. Good enough to eat. Or kiss. Or stare at longingly. And stare they did. Especially Doug. It wasn’t like he had a lot else to do.Doug was excited. It was hard to tell, because his jowls sagged at the same dejected angle whatever his emotions, and his dumpy body had trouble expressing passion. But in his heart he was excited. He could see the clock through the receptionists’ office door, and it was nearly 9:00 a.m. Only a few more minutes.Nina arrived at 8:56. She was running late, as usual, but Doug didn’t mind. She always arrived through the staff entrance out the side, so he never saw her come in. Only her hurried ghost in the window as she threw her bag under the counter, swept back her hair, and tried in vain to smooth her unironed uniform across that little body of hers. Christ, she was good-looking. Doug knew he didn’t have a chance, but—well, a guy could look.The clock ticked over. 8:58. Not long now.

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