Apple acknowledges the iKid generation at its developer conference with new parental controls

Michael A. Cowling, James R. Birt

Research output: Contribution to journalOnline ResourceResearch

Abstract

Apple’s Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) kicked off this week. While new iPhones were nowhere to be found – Apple CEO Tim Cook started the event by letting us know it was “all about software” – the company did preview some interesting changes to their iPhone and iPad operating system. They’ve added new apps, advanced augmented reality features and performance improvements. But perhaps one of the most interesting new features for parents and educators was the dual admission that while coding and creativity is important, a balance for kids is also something that Apple values. This is perhaps best exemplified by the addition of a new set of parental controls that allow parents and teachers to limit time in certain apps and set restrictions on iDevice usage for kids. With these changes available in iOS 12 – due for release in September – it feels like Apple is finally acknowledging the new type of digital native they’ve created, and taking earlier steps to make sure their technology is used responsibly.
Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Conversation
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jun 2018

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Apple acknowledges the iKid generation at its developer conference with new parental controls. / Cowling, Michael A.; Birt, James R.

In: The Conversation, 07.06.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalOnline ResourceResearch

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