Appearance-based or health-based message framing: what motivates physical activity participation?

Melissa Saken, Jayde Williams, Elisa Canetti, Wayne A Hing, Suzanne Gough

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Aim: To explore which factors may influence physical activity participation and whether message framing may influence motivation to participate in physical activity.
Design: Usability study with a self-reported electronic questionnaire
Method: The questionnaire consisted of seven sections: demographics, Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire, exercise prevention, exercise motivation, message framing, message perception and a manipulation check. Two hundred thirteen respondents consisting of 51 (23.9%) males and 161 (75.6%)
females between 19 and 76 years old (mean = 38.8 years) recruited by email or social media completed the 28-item online questionnaire.
Results: A positive health-based message was most likely to motivate physical activity participation, whilst a negative appearance-based message was least likely to motivate. Barriers to physical activity participation included lack of time, injury, soreness/fatigue and weather, while motivators included health, enjoyment, appearance and social interaction. The manipulation checks revealed many respondents correctly identified the message framing option as health/appearance and positive/negative (90.1- 98.6%).
Conclusion: This study highlights the importance of message framing to influence motivation to physical activity participation. A positive health-based message was most likely to motivate physical activity participation, whilst negative appearance-based message was least likely to motivate.
Key Practice Points:
• A positive health-based message is most motivating for physical activity participation
• A negative appearance-based message is least motivating for physical activity participation
• Lack of time is the main barrier to physical activity
Proposed impact, if any, on the health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: This study is not specific to Aboriginals or Torres Strait Islanders, however it provides insight into message framing to increase exercise participation along with common motivators and barriers to physical activity participation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages251-252
Number of pages2
Publication statusPublished - 18 Oct 2019
EventTRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference - Adelaide Convention Centre, Adelaide, Australia
Duration: 17 Oct 201919 Oct 2019
https://transform.physio/
https://transform.physio/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/Abstract_Book_Adelaide_2019.pdf (Abstracts)
https://transform.physio/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/APA_2019_POCKET_PROGRAM_A5_2.pdf%22 (Full Program)

Conference

ConferenceTRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference
Abbreviated titleAPA
CountryAustralia
CityAdelaide
Period17/10/1919/10/19
Internet address

Fingerprint

Health
Motivation
Social Media
Architectural Accessibility
Leisure Activities
Weather
Interpersonal Relations
Fatigue
Demography
Surveys and Questionnaires
Wounds and Injuries

Cite this

Saken, M., Williams, J., Canetti, E., Hing, W. A., & Gough, S. (2019). Appearance-based or health-based message framing: what motivates physical activity participation?. 251-252. Abstract from TRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference, Adelaide, Australia.
Saken, Melissa ; Williams, Jayde ; Canetti, Elisa ; Hing, Wayne A ; Gough, Suzanne. / Appearance-based or health-based message framing: what motivates physical activity participation?. Abstract from TRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference, Adelaide, Australia.2 p.
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Saken, M, Williams, J, Canetti, E, Hing, WA & Gough, S 2019, 'Appearance-based or health-based message framing: what motivates physical activity participation?' TRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference, Adelaide, Australia, 17/10/19 - 19/10/19, pp. 251-252.

Appearance-based or health-based message framing: what motivates physical activity participation? / Saken, Melissa; Williams, Jayde; Canetti, Elisa; Hing, Wayne A; Gough, Suzanne.

2019. 251-252 Abstract from TRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference, Adelaide, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - Appearance-based or health-based message framing: what motivates physical activity participation?

AU - Saken, Melissa

AU - Williams, Jayde

AU - Canetti, Elisa

AU - Hing, Wayne A

AU - Gough, Suzanne

PY - 2019/10/18

Y1 - 2019/10/18

N2 - Aim: To explore which factors may influence physical activity participation and whether message framing may influence motivation to participate in physical activity.Design: Usability study with a self-reported electronic questionnaireMethod: The questionnaire consisted of seven sections: demographics, Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire, exercise prevention, exercise motivation, message framing, message perception and a manipulation check. Two hundred thirteen respondents consisting of 51 (23.9%) males and 161 (75.6%)females between 19 and 76 years old (mean = 38.8 years) recruited by email or social media completed the 28-item online questionnaire.Results: A positive health-based message was most likely to motivate physical activity participation, whilst a negative appearance-based message was least likely to motivate. Barriers to physical activity participation included lack of time, injury, soreness/fatigue and weather, while motivators included health, enjoyment, appearance and social interaction. The manipulation checks revealed many respondents correctly identified the message framing option as health/appearance and positive/negative (90.1- 98.6%).Conclusion: This study highlights the importance of message framing to influence motivation to physical activity participation. A positive health-based message was most likely to motivate physical activity participation, whilst negative appearance-based message was least likely to motivate.Key Practice Points:• A positive health-based message is most motivating for physical activity participation• A negative appearance-based message is least motivating for physical activity participation• Lack of time is the main barrier to physical activityProposed impact, if any, on the health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: This study is not specific to Aboriginals or Torres Strait Islanders, however it provides insight into message framing to increase exercise participation along with common motivators and barriers to physical activity participation.

AB - Aim: To explore which factors may influence physical activity participation and whether message framing may influence motivation to participate in physical activity.Design: Usability study with a self-reported electronic questionnaireMethod: The questionnaire consisted of seven sections: demographics, Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire, exercise prevention, exercise motivation, message framing, message perception and a manipulation check. Two hundred thirteen respondents consisting of 51 (23.9%) males and 161 (75.6%)females between 19 and 76 years old (mean = 38.8 years) recruited by email or social media completed the 28-item online questionnaire.Results: A positive health-based message was most likely to motivate physical activity participation, whilst a negative appearance-based message was least likely to motivate. Barriers to physical activity participation included lack of time, injury, soreness/fatigue and weather, while motivators included health, enjoyment, appearance and social interaction. The manipulation checks revealed many respondents correctly identified the message framing option as health/appearance and positive/negative (90.1- 98.6%).Conclusion: This study highlights the importance of message framing to influence motivation to physical activity participation. A positive health-based message was most likely to motivate physical activity participation, whilst negative appearance-based message was least likely to motivate.Key Practice Points:• A positive health-based message is most motivating for physical activity participation• A negative appearance-based message is least motivating for physical activity participation• Lack of time is the main barrier to physical activityProposed impact, if any, on the health outcomes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people: This study is not specific to Aboriginals or Torres Strait Islanders, however it provides insight into message framing to increase exercise participation along with common motivators and barriers to physical activity participation.

M3 - Abstract

SP - 251

EP - 252

ER -

Saken M, Williams J, Canetti E, Hing WA, Gough S. Appearance-based or health-based message framing: what motivates physical activity participation?. 2019. Abstract from TRANSFORM 2019 Physiotherapy Conference, Adelaide, Australia.