Antecedents of new venture success: Spatial aspects of organizing

Elizabeth J Sander, Peter Bacevice, Arran Caza, Paul Burton

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This paper is the 4th part of the session titled: "THE SPATIAL TURN: THE INTERFACE OF SPATIAL AND SOCIAL FACTORS, AND THEIR IMPACT ON ORGANIZATIONAL OUTCOMES"
Given the potential value of new ventures, both scholarly and popular discourse is increasingly focused on the factors that help create environments where “innovation happens” as a way to jumpstart the growth and success of new ventures (Schrage, 2014; Zygiaris, 2013), and particularly on spatial or environmental components (Peters, Rice, & Sundararajan, 2004). While a significant body of research has been focused on macro level factors such as regional innovation systems (Asheim & Gertler, 2006; Asheim & Isaksen, 2002; Cooke, 2002), there is a burgeoning focus at the micro level on the spaces where people actually co-locate, collaborate, and explore new ideas. These spaces include corporate R&D labs, incubators, research parks, and university/industry accelerators (Brown & Duguid, 2001; Etzkowitz, et al, 2000; Geiger, 2004; Peters, Rice, & Sundararajan, 2004); and the relatively emergent phenomenon of coworking spaces (Fuzi, 2015; Garrett, Spreitzer, & Bacevice, in press; Spinuzzi, 2012).As the blurring of organizational and institutional boundaries becomes recognized as an important antecedent of innovation and entrepreneurship (Lakhani, Lifshitz-Assaf & Tushman (2012), research has begun to focus on ways in which spatial factors influence innovation and new ventures. Much of this research to date has focused on variables such as interaction, evolution of social ties and transfer of knowledge (see Sailer & McCullough, 2012; Storper & Venables, 2004; Wineman, et al 2014 for examples). To date, no known empirical studies have been conducted examining the conceptual linkages between spatial factors and new venture success. As policy-makers around the world promote and pursue the economic benefits of nurturing entrepreneurship and new venture success in their communities, we suggest understanding the role of local spatial factors is an important variable of empirical study in this context. To understand more broadly the ways in which spatial factors contribute to new venture success, we undertake a qualitative exploratory approach conducting interviews with venture capitalists. We describe the study below.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2017
EventThe 77th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management : At the interface - Hilton, Atlanta, United States
Duration: 5 Aug 20179 Aug 2017
Conference number: 77th
http://my.aom.org/ProgramDocs/2017/pdf/AOM_2017_Annual_Meeting_Program.pdf
http://aom.org/annualmeeting/

Conference

ConferenceThe 77th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management
CountryUnited States
CityAtlanta
Period5/08/179/08/17
Internet address

Fingerprint

Organizing
New ventures
Factors
Innovation
Entrepreneurship
Empirical study
Venture capitalists
Discourse
Politicians
Incubator
Regional innovation systems
Linkage
Interaction
Economic benefits
Social factors
Influence factors
Organizational outcomes
Social ties
Knowledge transfer
Industry

Cite this

Sander, E. J., Bacevice, P., Caza, A., & Burton, P. (2017). Antecedents of new venture success: Spatial aspects of organizing. Paper presented at The 77th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management , Atlanta, United States.
Sander, Elizabeth J ; Bacevice, Peter ; Caza, Arran ; Burton, Paul. / Antecedents of new venture success : Spatial aspects of organizing. Paper presented at The 77th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management , Atlanta, United States.
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Sander, EJ, Bacevice, P, Caza, A & Burton, P 2017, 'Antecedents of new venture success: Spatial aspects of organizing' Paper presented at The 77th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management , Atlanta, United States, 5/08/17 - 9/08/17, .

Antecedents of new venture success : Spatial aspects of organizing. / Sander, Elizabeth J; Bacevice, Peter ; Caza, Arran; Burton, Paul.

2017. Paper presented at The 77th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management , Atlanta, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - Antecedents of new venture success

T2 - Spatial aspects of organizing

AU - Sander, Elizabeth J

AU - Bacevice, Peter

AU - Caza, Arran

AU - Burton, Paul

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - This paper is the 4th part of the session titled: "THE SPATIAL TURN: THE INTERFACE OF SPATIAL AND SOCIAL FACTORS, AND THEIR IMPACT ON ORGANIZATIONAL OUTCOMES"Given the potential value of new ventures, both scholarly and popular discourse is increasingly focused on the factors that help create environments where “innovation happens” as a way to jumpstart the growth and success of new ventures (Schrage, 2014; Zygiaris, 2013), and particularly on spatial or environmental components (Peters, Rice, & Sundararajan, 2004). While a significant body of research has been focused on macro level factors such as regional innovation systems (Asheim & Gertler, 2006; Asheim & Isaksen, 2002; Cooke, 2002), there is a burgeoning focus at the micro level on the spaces where people actually co-locate, collaborate, and explore new ideas. These spaces include corporate R&D labs, incubators, research parks, and university/industry accelerators (Brown & Duguid, 2001; Etzkowitz, et al, 2000; Geiger, 2004; Peters, Rice, & Sundararajan, 2004); and the relatively emergent phenomenon of coworking spaces (Fuzi, 2015; Garrett, Spreitzer, & Bacevice, in press; Spinuzzi, 2012).As the blurring of organizational and institutional boundaries becomes recognized as an important antecedent of innovation and entrepreneurship (Lakhani, Lifshitz-Assaf & Tushman (2012), research has begun to focus on ways in which spatial factors influence innovation and new ventures. Much of this research to date has focused on variables such as interaction, evolution of social ties and transfer of knowledge (see Sailer & McCullough, 2012; Storper & Venables, 2004; Wineman, et al 2014 for examples). To date, no known empirical studies have been conducted examining the conceptual linkages between spatial factors and new venture success. As policy-makers around the world promote and pursue the economic benefits of nurturing entrepreneurship and new venture success in their communities, we suggest understanding the role of local spatial factors is an important variable of empirical study in this context. To understand more broadly the ways in which spatial factors contribute to new venture success, we undertake a qualitative exploratory approach conducting interviews with venture capitalists. We describe the study below.

AB - This paper is the 4th part of the session titled: "THE SPATIAL TURN: THE INTERFACE OF SPATIAL AND SOCIAL FACTORS, AND THEIR IMPACT ON ORGANIZATIONAL OUTCOMES"Given the potential value of new ventures, both scholarly and popular discourse is increasingly focused on the factors that help create environments where “innovation happens” as a way to jumpstart the growth and success of new ventures (Schrage, 2014; Zygiaris, 2013), and particularly on spatial or environmental components (Peters, Rice, & Sundararajan, 2004). While a significant body of research has been focused on macro level factors such as regional innovation systems (Asheim & Gertler, 2006; Asheim & Isaksen, 2002; Cooke, 2002), there is a burgeoning focus at the micro level on the spaces where people actually co-locate, collaborate, and explore new ideas. These spaces include corporate R&D labs, incubators, research parks, and university/industry accelerators (Brown & Duguid, 2001; Etzkowitz, et al, 2000; Geiger, 2004; Peters, Rice, & Sundararajan, 2004); and the relatively emergent phenomenon of coworking spaces (Fuzi, 2015; Garrett, Spreitzer, & Bacevice, in press; Spinuzzi, 2012).As the blurring of organizational and institutional boundaries becomes recognized as an important antecedent of innovation and entrepreneurship (Lakhani, Lifshitz-Assaf & Tushman (2012), research has begun to focus on ways in which spatial factors influence innovation and new ventures. Much of this research to date has focused on variables such as interaction, evolution of social ties and transfer of knowledge (see Sailer & McCullough, 2012; Storper & Venables, 2004; Wineman, et al 2014 for examples). To date, no known empirical studies have been conducted examining the conceptual linkages between spatial factors and new venture success. As policy-makers around the world promote and pursue the economic benefits of nurturing entrepreneurship and new venture success in their communities, we suggest understanding the role of local spatial factors is an important variable of empirical study in this context. To understand more broadly the ways in which spatial factors contribute to new venture success, we undertake a qualitative exploratory approach conducting interviews with venture capitalists. We describe the study below.

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M3 - Paper

ER -

Sander EJ, Bacevice P, Caza A, Burton P. Antecedents of new venture success: Spatial aspects of organizing. 2017. Paper presented at The 77th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management , Atlanta, United States.