Antecedents and consequences of self-congruity

Rajat Roy, Fazlul K. Rabbanee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose – This study aims to propose and test a parsimonious framework for self-congruity, albeit in the context of luxury branding. This paper is the frst to propose an integrated model focusing on the drivers and consequences of self-congruity. The model is further applied to explain how self-congruity may motivate future experiences with the luxury brand, mainly by infuencing self-perception. Although a substantive marketing literature on self-congruity currently exists, there is a lack of an integrated framework, a gap that the current work addresses. Design/methodology/approach – A paper and pencil survey was conducted among female subjects only, and structural path relationships were tested using AMOS. Findings – Consumers’ self-congruity with a luxury brand (non-luxury brand) is positively (negatively) infuenced by its antecedents: social desirability, need for uniqueness and status consumption. Self-congruity with a luxury (non-luxury) brand is found to enhance (undermine) consumers’ self-perceptions. This, in turn, is found to have a stronger (weaker) positive impact on consumers’ motivation to re-use a shopping bag from luxury brand (non-luxury brand) for hedonic purpose. Mediation analyses show that self-congruity has a positive (negative) indirect effecton hedonic use via self-perception for luxury (non-luxury) brand. Research limitations/implications – Future studies may involve actual shoppers, causal design and additional variables like “utilitarian usage “of shopping bags to extend the proposed framework. Practical implications – A better understanding of the fndings has implications for brand positioning, advertising and packaging. Originality/value – Till date, no research has examined a parsimonious model for self-congruity complete with its antecedents and consequences and tested it in the context of a luxury versus non-luxury brand.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)444-466
Number of pages23
JournalEuropean Journal of Marketing
Volume49
Issue number3-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Apr 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Self-congruity
Luxury
Luxury brands
Self-perception
Shopping
Integrated
Uniqueness
Marketing
Reuse
Status consumption
Packaging
Branding
Social desirability
Brand positioning
Design methodology
Mediation
Integrated model

Cite this

Roy, Rajat ; Rabbanee, Fazlul K. / Antecedents and consequences of self-congruity. In: European Journal of Marketing. 2015 ; Vol. 49, No. 3-4. pp. 444-466.
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Antecedents and consequences of self-congruity. / Roy, Rajat; Rabbanee, Fazlul K.

In: European Journal of Marketing, Vol. 49, No. 3-4, 13.04.2015, p. 444-466.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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