Analysis of the Effects of Sex and Age on Upper- and Lower-Body Power for Law Enforcement Agency Recruits Before Academy Training

Robert G. Lockie, James Jay Dawes, Rob Marc Orr, Michael Stierli, Joseph Dulla, Ashley J. Orjalo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Power is an important characteristic for law enforcement officers. Tasks such as carrying or dragging a civilian to safety, jumping or vaulting, and suspect restraint and pursuit require power to be effective. Certain recruits may be lacking in these qualities even if they have been accepted to a law enforcement agency (LEA). This study investigated upper- and lower-body power in male and female LEA recruits, and recruits of different ages, before academy training. Retrospective analysis of recruit data from one LEA was conducted. The measurements were: vertical jump (VJ) height; peak anaerobic power calculated by the Sayers equation; power-to-body mass ratio (P:BM); seated medicine ball throw (MBT) distance; and MBT distance relative to body mass. Independent-sample t-tests were used to compare the sexes, whereas a 1-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc compared the pooled data for recruits across different age groups (20–24; 25–29; 30–34; and 35+ years). The male recruits demonstrated superior performance across all power tests compared with the female recruits (p < 0.001). Regarding age, the 35+ year group performed less than optimally in the VJ and P:BM compared with the 20–24 and 24–29 years groups, and in the relative MBT compared with the 20–24 and 30–34 years groups (p = 0.003–0.037). Despite being accepted to a LEA, female recruits and recruits aged 35+ years of age may be lacking in upper- and lower-body power. Female and older recruits should participate in strength and power training before academy attendance to maintain or enhance these qualities.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1968-1974
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Volume32
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2018

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Law Enforcement
Medicine
Resistance Training
Police
Analysis of Variance
Age Groups
Safety

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title = "Analysis of the Effects of Sex and Age on Upper- and Lower-Body Power for Law Enforcement Agency Recruits Before Academy Training",
abstract = "Power is an important characteristic for law enforcement officers. Tasks such as carrying or dragging a civilian to safety, jumping or vaulting, and suspect restraint and pursuit require power to be effective. Certain recruits may be lacking in these qualities even if they have been accepted to a law enforcement agency (LEA). This study investigated upper- and lower-body power in male and female LEA recruits, and recruits of different ages, before academy training. Retrospective analysis of recruit data from one LEA was conducted. The measurements were: vertical jump (VJ) height; peak anaerobic power calculated by the Sayers equation; power-to-body mass ratio (P:BM); seated medicine ball throw (MBT) distance; and MBT distance relative to body mass. Independent-sample t-tests were used to compare the sexes, whereas a 1-way analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc compared the pooled data for recruits across different age groups (20–24; 25–29; 30–34; and 35+ years). The male recruits demonstrated superior performance across all power tests compared with the female recruits (p < 0.001). Regarding age, the 35+ year group performed less than optimally in the VJ and P:BM compared with the 20–24 and 24–29 years groups, and in the relative MBT compared with the 20–24 and 30–34 years groups (p = 0.003–0.037). Despite being accepted to a LEA, female recruits and recruits aged 35+ years of age may be lacking in upper- and lower-body power. Female and older recruits should participate in strength and power training before academy attendance to maintain or enhance these qualities.",
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Analysis of the Effects of Sex and Age on Upper- and Lower-Body Power for Law Enforcement Agency Recruits Before Academy Training. / Lockie, Robert G.; Dawes, James Jay; Orr, Rob Marc; Stierli, Michael; Dulla, Joseph; Orjalo, Ashley J.

In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, Vol. 32, No. 7, 07.2018, p. 1968-1974.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Dulla, Joseph

AU - Orjalo, Ashley J.

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