Analysing the protection from respiratory tract infections and allergic diseases early in life by human milk components: the PRIMA birth cohort

Arthur H. van Stigt, Katrien Oude Rengerink, Kitty W.M. Bloemenkamp, Wouter de Waal, Sabine M.P.J. Prevaes, Thuy My Le, Femke van Wijk, Maaike Nederend, Anneke H. Hellinga, Christianne S. Lammers, Gerco den Hartog, Martijn J.C. van Herwijnen, Johan Garssen, Léon M.J. Knippels, Lilly M. Verhagen, Caroline G.M. de Theije, Jeanette H.W. Leusen, Alejandro Lopez-Rincon, Belinda van’t Land, Louis Bont*PRIMA Initiative Group

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Background: Many studies support the protective effect of breastfeeding on respiratory tract infections. Although infant formulas have been developed to provide adequate nutritional solutions, many components in human milk contributing to the protection of newborns and aiding immune development still need to be identified. In this paper we present the methodology of the “Protecting against Respiratory tract lnfections through human Milk Analysis” (PRIMA) cohort, which is an observational, prospective and multi-centre birth cohort aiming to identify novel functions of components in human milk that are protective against respiratory tract infections and allergic diseases early in life. Methods: For the PRIMA human milk cohort we aim to recruit 1000 mother–child pairs in the first month postpartum. At one week, one, three, and six months after birth, fresh human milk samples will be collected and processed. In order to identify protective components, the level of pathogen specific antibodies, T cell composition, Human milk oligosaccharides, as well as extracellular vesicles (EVs) will be analysed, in the milk samples in relation to clinical data which are collected using two-weekly parental questionnaires. The primary outcome of this study is the number of parent-reported medically attended respiratory infections. Secondary outcomes that will be measured are physician diagnosed (respiratory) infections and allergies during the first year of life. Discussion: The PRIMA human milk cohort will be a large prospective healthy birth cohort in which we will use an integrated, multidisciplinary approach to identify the longitudinal effect human milk components that play a role in preventing (respiratory) infections and allergies during the first year of life. Ultimately, we believe that this study will provide novel insights into immunomodulatory components in human milk. This may allow for optimizing formula feeding for all non-breastfed infants.

Original languageEnglish
Article number152
JournalBMC Infectious Diseases
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2022

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