An integrated response to risks of violence against bus drivers: When on-board assaults affect safety on our roads

RA Lincoln, Shane Stockill

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Recent Queensland research has established that incidents of client-initiated aggression on public transport are far from rare and that these events can significantly impact driver safety, compromise passenger well-being and can create dangers for other road users. These data, for the first time, reveal that there are patterns to incidents of on-board aggression, and point to a need for a broader approach to respond to such incidents. This research evidence provides a sound base to advance an integroted policy framework, and informs a collaborative approach to address bus driver violence.
Emerging patterns of aggression and violence on Australian public transport suggest violence hot spots exist in most states, across public transport modes, times and routes, with aggression towards drivers frequently escalating in intensity. Risks to driver safety commonly arise from client expectations and anti­social behaviours. Contributing factors include the broader operating environment, such as increased traffic density and acts of 'road rage' from the interplay between public transport and other road users, and pose road safety concerns. Consideration of these broader risk factors will inform effective responses to aggression and violence towards bus drivers.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventThe Australiasian College of Road Safety Conference 2015 - Gold Coast, Australia
Duration: 14 Oct 201516 Oct 2015
http://australasianroadsafetyconference.com.au/about/past-conferences-2/

Conference

ConferenceThe Australiasian College of Road Safety Conference 2015
Abbreviated titleARSC
CountryAustralia
CityGold Coast
Period14/10/1516/10/15
Internet address

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assault
aggression
public transport
driver
road
violence
incident
road user
traffic volume
compromise
well-being
event
evidence

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Lincoln, RA., & Stockill, S. (2015). An integrated response to risks of violence against bus drivers: When on-board assaults affect safety on our roads. Abstract from The Australiasian College of Road Safety Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia.
Lincoln, RA ; Stockill, Shane. / An integrated response to risks of violence against bus drivers : When on-board assaults affect safety on our roads. Abstract from The Australiasian College of Road Safety Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia.
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title = "An integrated response to risks of violence against bus drivers: When on-board assaults affect safety on our roads",
abstract = "Recent Queensland research has established that incidents of client-initiated aggression on public transport are far from rare and that these events can significantly impact driver safety, compromise passenger well-being and can create dangers for other road users. These data, for the first time, reveal that there are patterns to incidents of on-board aggression, and point to a need for a broader approach to respond to such incidents. This research evidence provides a sound base to advance an integroted policy framework, and informs a collaborative approach to address bus driver violence. Emerging patterns of aggression and violence on Australian public transport suggest violence hot spots exist in most states, across public transport modes, times and routes, with aggression towards drivers frequently escalating in intensity. Risks to driver safety commonly arise from client expectations and anti­social behaviours. Contributing factors include the broader operating environment, such as increased traffic density and acts of 'road rage' from the interplay between public transport and other road users, and pose road safety concerns. Consideration of these broader risk factors will inform effective responses to aggression and violence towards bus drivers.",
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year = "2015",
language = "English",
note = "The Australiasian College of Road Safety Conference 2015, ARSC ; Conference date: 14-10-2015 Through 16-10-2015",
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Lincoln, RA & Stockill, S 2015, 'An integrated response to risks of violence against bus drivers: When on-board assaults affect safety on our roads' The Australiasian College of Road Safety Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia, 14/10/15 - 16/10/15, .

An integrated response to risks of violence against bus drivers : When on-board assaults affect safety on our roads. / Lincoln, RA; Stockill, Shane.

2015. Abstract from The Australiasian College of Road Safety Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - An integrated response to risks of violence against bus drivers

T2 - When on-board assaults affect safety on our roads

AU - Lincoln, RA

AU - Stockill, Shane

PY - 2015

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N2 - Recent Queensland research has established that incidents of client-initiated aggression on public transport are far from rare and that these events can significantly impact driver safety, compromise passenger well-being and can create dangers for other road users. These data, for the first time, reveal that there are patterns to incidents of on-board aggression, and point to a need for a broader approach to respond to such incidents. This research evidence provides a sound base to advance an integroted policy framework, and informs a collaborative approach to address bus driver violence. Emerging patterns of aggression and violence on Australian public transport suggest violence hot spots exist in most states, across public transport modes, times and routes, with aggression towards drivers frequently escalating in intensity. Risks to driver safety commonly arise from client expectations and anti­social behaviours. Contributing factors include the broader operating environment, such as increased traffic density and acts of 'road rage' from the interplay between public transport and other road users, and pose road safety concerns. Consideration of these broader risk factors will inform effective responses to aggression and violence towards bus drivers.

AB - Recent Queensland research has established that incidents of client-initiated aggression on public transport are far from rare and that these events can significantly impact driver safety, compromise passenger well-being and can create dangers for other road users. These data, for the first time, reveal that there are patterns to incidents of on-board aggression, and point to a need for a broader approach to respond to such incidents. This research evidence provides a sound base to advance an integroted policy framework, and informs a collaborative approach to address bus driver violence. Emerging patterns of aggression and violence on Australian public transport suggest violence hot spots exist in most states, across public transport modes, times and routes, with aggression towards drivers frequently escalating in intensity. Risks to driver safety commonly arise from client expectations and anti­social behaviours. Contributing factors include the broader operating environment, such as increased traffic density and acts of 'road rage' from the interplay between public transport and other road users, and pose road safety concerns. Consideration of these broader risk factors will inform effective responses to aggression and violence towards bus drivers.

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Lincoln RA, Stockill S. An integrated response to risks of violence against bus drivers: When on-board assaults affect safety on our roads. 2015. Abstract from The Australiasian College of Road Safety Conference 2015, Gold Coast, Australia.