An evaluation of a public health nutrition workforce development intervention for the nutrition and dietetics workforce

C. Palermo, R. Hughes, Louise McCall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Workforce development is a key element for building the capacity to effectively address priority population nutrition issues. On-the-job learning and mentoring have been proposed as strategies for practice improvement in public health nutrition; however, there is limited evidence for their effectiveness. Methods: An evaluation of a mentoring circle workforce development intervention was undertaken. Thirty-two novice public health nutritionists participated in one of three mentoring circles for 2 h, every 6 weeks, over a 7-month period. Pre- and post-intervention qualitative (questionnaire, interview, mentor diary) and quantitative (competence, time working in public health nutrition) data were collected. Results: The novice public health nutritionists explained the intervention facilitated sharing of ideas and strategies and promoted reflective practice. They articulated the important attributes of the mentor in the intervention as having experience in and a passion for public health, facilitating a trusting relationship and providing effective feedback. Participants reported a gain in competency and had an overall mean increase in self-reported competence of 15% (range 3-48% change; P < 0.05) across a broad range of competency elements. Many participants described re-orienting their practice towards population prevention, with quantifiable increases in work time allocated to preventive work post-intervention. Conclusions: Mentoring supported service re-orientation and competency development in public health nutrition. The nature of the group learning environment and the role and qualities of the mentor were important elements contributing to the interventions effects. Mentoring circles offer a potentially effective strategy for workforce development in nutrition and dietetics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)244-253
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Health Manpower
Dietetics
Public Health
Mentors
Nutritionists
Mental Competency
Learning
Capacity Building
Population
Mentoring
Interviews

Cite this

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abstract = "Background: Workforce development is a key element for building the capacity to effectively address priority population nutrition issues. On-the-job learning and mentoring have been proposed as strategies for practice improvement in public health nutrition; however, there is limited evidence for their effectiveness. Methods: An evaluation of a mentoring circle workforce development intervention was undertaken. Thirty-two novice public health nutritionists participated in one of three mentoring circles for 2 h, every 6 weeks, over a 7-month period. Pre- and post-intervention qualitative (questionnaire, interview, mentor diary) and quantitative (competence, time working in public health nutrition) data were collected. Results: The novice public health nutritionists explained the intervention facilitated sharing of ideas and strategies and promoted reflective practice. They articulated the important attributes of the mentor in the intervention as having experience in and a passion for public health, facilitating a trusting relationship and providing effective feedback. Participants reported a gain in competency and had an overall mean increase in self-reported competence of 15{\%} (range 3-48{\%} change; P < 0.05) across a broad range of competency elements. Many participants described re-orienting their practice towards population prevention, with quantifiable increases in work time allocated to preventive work post-intervention. Conclusions: Mentoring supported service re-orientation and competency development in public health nutrition. The nature of the group learning environment and the role and qualities of the mentor were important elements contributing to the interventions effects. Mentoring circles offer a potentially effective strategy for workforce development in nutrition and dietetics.",
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An evaluation of a public health nutrition workforce development intervention for the nutrition and dietetics workforce. / Palermo, C.; Hughes, R.; McCall, Louise.

In: Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, Vol. 23, No. 3, 06.2010, p. 244-253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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