Age and Marital Status Predict Mild Cognitive Impairment During Acute Coronary Syndrome Admission: An Observational Study of Acute Coronary Syndrome Inpatients

Joseph Weddell, Sharon L. Naismith, Adrian Bauman, Geoffrey Tofler, Emma Zhao, Julie Redfern*, Tom Buckley, Robyn Gallagher

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background:

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) has been reported after acute coronary syndrome (ACS), but it is uncertain who is at risk, particularly during inpatient admission. 

Objective:

In this study, we aimed to explore the prevalence and cognitive domains affected in MCI during ACS admission and determine factors that identify patients most at risk of MCI. 

Methods:

Inpatients with ACS were consecutively recruited from 2 tertiary hospital cardiac wards and screened with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test. Screening included health literacy (Newest Vital Sign), depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), and physical activity (Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly). Factors associated with MCI were determined using logistic regression. 

Results:

Participants (n = 81) had a mean (SD) age of 63.5 (10.9) years, and 82.7% were male. In total, MCI was identified in 52.5%, 42.5% with 1 screen and 10% with both. Individually, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment identified MCI in 48.1%, and the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test identified MCI in 13.8%. In Montreal Cognitive Assessment screening, the cognitive domains in which participants most frequently did not achieve the maximum points available were delayed recall (81.5%), visuospatial executive function (48.1%), and attention (30.9%). Accounting for education, depression, physical activity, and ACS diagnosis, the likelihood of an MCI positive screen increased by 11% per year of age (odds ratio, 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.18) and by 3.6 times for those who are unmarried/unpartnered (odds ratio, 3.61; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-11.89). 

Conclusion:

An estimated half of patients with ACS screen positive for MCI during admission, with single and older patients most at risk. Multiple areas of thinking were affected with potential impact on capacity for learning heart disease management.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)462-471
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Cardiovascular Nursing
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sept 2023
Externally publishedYes

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