Adaptive multi-rate compression effects on vowel analysis

David Ireland, Christina Knuepffer, Simon J McBride

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Signal processing on digitally sampled vowel sounds for the detection of pathological voices has been firmly established. This work examines compression artifacts on vowel speech samples that have been compressed using the adaptive multi-rate codec at various bit-rates. Whereas previous work has used the sensitivity of machine learning algorithm to test for accuracy, this work examines the changes in the extracted speech features themselves and thus report new findings on the usefulness of a particular feature. We believe this work will have potential impact for future research on remote monitoring as the identification and exclusion of an ill-defined speech feature that has been hitherto used, will ultimately increase the robustness of the system.

Original languageEnglish
Article number118
Pages (from-to)118
JournalFrontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology
Volume3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Aug 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Artifacts
Learning algorithms
Learning systems
Signal processing
Acoustic waves
Monitoring
Machine Learning

Cite this

Ireland, David ; Knuepffer, Christina ; McBride, Simon J. / Adaptive multi-rate compression effects on vowel analysis. In: Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology. 2015 ; Vol. 3. pp. 118.
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Adaptive multi-rate compression effects on vowel analysis. / Ireland, David; Knuepffer, Christina; McBride, Simon J.

In: Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology, Vol. 3, 118, 20.08.2015, p. 118.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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