Achieving high student evaluation of teaching response rates through a culture of academic-student collaboration

Diana Knight, Vishendran Naidu, Shelley Kinash

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

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    Abstract

    At the conclusion of each university semester, students are asked to complete surveys evaluating their educators and subjects. Research indicates that online student evaluation of teaching is a preferred means to paper-based surveys. The primary drawback of online evaluation is that the student response rates are usually low, leading to concerns that the reliability, validity and qualitative feedback may be compromised. This paper presents a case study of a small, not-for-profit private university that achieved response rates of nearly 90% on the Likert scale items of online student evaluation of teaching in the first semester of whole-of-university implementation. These response rates were achieved through a collaborative staff/student design and marketing program. One of the main factors heightening participation rates was a student-recommended customisation of the EvaluationKIT system, whereby students had to either complete their surveys or provide a reason for non-participation in order to access their subjects' Blackboard learning management subject sites.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationAustralian Higher Education Evaluation Forum (AHEEF) 2012, Embedding an internal evaluation , Rockhampton, 8th- 10th October 2012
    PublisherCQ University
    Pages126-144
    Number of pages18
    Publication statusPublished - 2012
    EventAustralian Higher Education Evaluation Forum (AHEEF) 2012 - Rockhampton, Australia
    Duration: 8 Oct 201210 Oct 2012

    Conference

    ConferenceAustralian Higher Education Evaluation Forum (AHEEF) 2012
    CountryAustralia
    CityRockhampton
    Period8/10/1210/10/12

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    Teaching
    evaluation
    student
    semester
    private university
    university
    profit
    marketing
    educator
    staff
    participation
    management
    learning

    Cite this

    Knight, D., Naidu, V., & Kinash, S. (2012). Achieving high student evaluation of teaching response rates through a culture of academic-student collaboration. In Australian Higher Education Evaluation Forum (AHEEF) 2012, Embedding an internal evaluation , Rockhampton, 8th- 10th October 2012 (pp. 126-144). CQ University.
    Knight, Diana ; Naidu, Vishendran ; Kinash, Shelley. / Achieving high student evaluation of teaching response rates through a culture of academic-student collaboration. Australian Higher Education Evaluation Forum (AHEEF) 2012, Embedding an internal evaluation , Rockhampton, 8th- 10th October 2012. CQ University, 2012. pp. 126-144
    @inproceedings{130f6364699749788347038ca0d93414,
    title = "Achieving high student evaluation of teaching response rates through a culture of academic-student collaboration",
    abstract = "At the conclusion of each university semester, students are asked to complete surveys evaluating their educators and subjects. Research indicates that online student evaluation of teaching is a preferred means to paper-based surveys. The primary drawback of online evaluation is that the student response rates are usually low, leading to concerns that the reliability, validity and qualitative feedback may be compromised. This paper presents a case study of a small, not-for-profit private university that achieved response rates of nearly 90{\%} on the Likert scale items of online student evaluation of teaching in the first semester of whole-of-university implementation. These response rates were achieved through a collaborative staff/student design and marketing program. One of the main factors heightening participation rates was a student-recommended customisation of the EvaluationKIT system, whereby students had to either complete their surveys or provide a reason for non-participation in order to access their subjects' Blackboard learning management subject sites.",
    author = "Diana Knight and Vishendran Naidu and Shelley Kinash",
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    Knight, D, Naidu, V & Kinash, S 2012, Achieving high student evaluation of teaching response rates through a culture of academic-student collaboration. in Australian Higher Education Evaluation Forum (AHEEF) 2012, Embedding an internal evaluation , Rockhampton, 8th- 10th October 2012. CQ University, pp. 126-144, Australian Higher Education Evaluation Forum (AHEEF) 2012, Rockhampton, Australia, 8/10/12.

    Achieving high student evaluation of teaching response rates through a culture of academic-student collaboration. / Knight, Diana; Naidu, Vishendran; Kinash, Shelley.

    Australian Higher Education Evaluation Forum (AHEEF) 2012, Embedding an internal evaluation , Rockhampton, 8th- 10th October 2012. CQ University, 2012. p. 126-144.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionResearchpeer-review

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    Knight D, Naidu V, Kinash S. Achieving high student evaluation of teaching response rates through a culture of academic-student collaboration. In Australian Higher Education Evaluation Forum (AHEEF) 2012, Embedding an internal evaluation , Rockhampton, 8th- 10th October 2012. CQ University. 2012. p. 126-144