Accumulating subcultural capital through sport event participation: The AFL International Cup

Sheranne Fairley, Danny O'Brien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this study, the authors use participant interviews to examine how participating in an international event enabled the accumulation of subcultural capital. The authors conducted interviews with players (N=9) in the Australian Football League (AFL) International Cup from Canada, USA, New Zealand, and Ireland. The AFL International Cup created a liminal state offering individuals with opportunities for: (a) national representation; (b) international competition and comparison; (c) cross-cultural learning and interaction; (d) sport subcultural engagement; and, (d) authentic game experiences. The resulting experience enabled participants a deeper connection with the sport subculture, which created the potential for sport advocacy in their home countries. Results will assist international sport event hosts in creating meaningful participant experiences that facilitate deeper personal attachments to the sporting subculture. (C) 2017 Sport Management Association of Australia and New Zealand. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

LanguageEnglish
Pages321-332
Number of pages12
JournalSport Management Review
Volume21
Issue number3
Early online date4 Sep 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2018

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sport
advocacy
learning
participation
Football
Participation
Sports events
Subculture
Home country
Canada
Ireland
Advocacy
New Zealand
International competition
Interaction
International comparison

Cite this

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Accumulating subcultural capital through sport event participation : The AFL International Cup. / Fairley, Sheranne; O'Brien, Danny.

In: Sport Management Review, Vol. 21, No. 3, 06.2018, p. 321-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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