A Qualitative Study of Clinician Barriers and Enablers to Implementing the Mediterranean Dietary Pattern with Kidney and Liver Transplant Recipients

Taya McLaren-Hedwards*, Ingrid J. Hickman, Katrina L. Campbell, Graeme A. Macdonald, Hannah L. Mayr

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
5 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Introduction: Solid organ transplant recipients experience greater cardiometabolic risk than the general population. Following a Mediterranean dietary pattern has been shown to reduce cardiometabolic risk. This study aimed to assess multidisciplinary clinician perspectives of routine nutrition care for kidney and liver transplant recipients and barriers and enablers to implementation of the Mediterranean dietary pattern. 

Methods: Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with clinicians in a metropolitan health service at tertiary/quaternary transplant centres involved in longer-term management of kidney and liver transplants recipients. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic content analysis. 

Findings: Nineteen clinicians (9 medical officers, 5 dietitians, 3 nurses and 2 other allied health professionals) were interviewed. Four themes with 11 subthemes were identified: the Mediterranean dietary pattern is not part of routine care (there are competing clinical priorities; healthy eating principles aligned with but not the full dietary pattern are recommended); variation in knowledge and acceptance of this dietary approach (variances in information sources and degree of knowledge of Mediterranean dietary pattern clinical evidence); nutrition advice is influenced by service delivery and culture (there is lack of consistent nutrition advice; limited consultation time; and reliance on existing patient education resources); and patient-centred care influences decisions on nutrition advice (clinicians do not know how to recommend this dietary pattern in a patient-centred manner). 

Discussion: The Mediterranean dietary pattern is not considered part of routine post-transplant nutrition care. To be implemented in these services intervention strategies which address the identified barriers and potential enablers need to be considered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)337-344
Number of pages8
JournalProgress in Transplantation
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021
Externally publishedYes

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