A Pilot Analysis of the Effects of Custody Shift Length on the Health and Fitness Characteristics of Deputy Sheriffs

Kayvon Pakdamanian, Kamran Pakdamanian, Matthew R. Moreno, Joseph Dulla, Jay J. Dawes, Rob Marc Orr, Robert G. Lockie

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

Within law enforcement agencies deputy sheriffs are primarily responsible for maintaining order and protecting a community by enforcing laws. Deputy sheriffs may work in custody facilities, where the primary job tasks are inmate supervision and if necessary, restraint. Following custody, deputy sheriffs may be assigned to patrol, where job tasks include the prevention of illegal activities, emergency response, and ensuring the safety of citizens. Depending on the position, shift hours can range from 8- 16 hours (or longer with overtime). Longer shifts may allow for more days off, which in some ways is preferable for some individuals, as it could allow for more family and recreational time. However, long shifts may contribute to greater fatigue and insufficient sleep. The purpose of this study was to provide a pilot analysis as to the potential impact shift length could have on the health and fitness of deputy sheriffs who have been working in custody. A retrospective examination was conducted on 60 deputies. The deputies self-reported their average shift length per week, which provided a split of deputies who typically had custody shift lengths of 12 hours or less (32 males, 5 females), or shifts greater than 12 hours (15 males, 7 females). Health and fitness assessments included: resting heart rate (RHR); resting blood pressure; fat and lean body mass measured via bioelectrical impedance; waist and hip circumference; waist-to-hip ratio (WHR); grip strength; push-ups and sit-ups in 60 s; and recovery heart rate from a YMCA 3-min step test. To compare any differences between the groups, univariate repeated measures ANOVA with sex as a covariate was utilized (p < 0.05). After evaluating the information, it was apparent that there were few differences between the groups. However, the RHR of deputies who worked shift hours longer than 12 hours had a significantly lower RHR (80.73 ± 9.47 bpm) in comparison to those deputies working 12 hours or less (94.03 ± 12.36 bpm). Deputies working more than 12 hours also had a significantly lower WHR (0.84 ± 0.07) than those working more than 12 hours (0.89 ± 0.06). Although this is a pilot analysis, working longer shifts had a more favorable RHR and WHR; these longer shifts could have allowed for more time off and the opportunity to make better lifestyle choices. Nonetheless, no other health or fitness characteristics differed between the groups. More investigation is required as to the impacts shift length can have on deputy sheriffs, and strategies to alleviate any negative effects.

Conference

Conference38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine
Abbreviated titleSWACSM
CountryUnited States
CityCosta Mesa
Period26/10/1827/10/18
Internet address

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Waist-Hip Ratio
Heart Rate
Health
Law Enforcement
Waist Circumference
Hand Strength
Electric Impedance
Exercise Test
Fatigue
Life Style
Hip
Analysis of Variance
Sleep
Emergencies
Fats
Blood Pressure
Safety

Cite this

Pakdamanian, K., Pakdamanian, K., Moreno, M. R., Dulla, J., Dawes, J. J., Orr, R. M., & Lockie, R. G. (2018). A Pilot Analysis of the Effects of Custody Shift Length on the Health and Fitness Characteristics of Deputy Sheriffs. Poster session presented at 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, Costa Mesa, United States.
Pakdamanian, Kayvon ; Pakdamanian, Kamran ; Moreno, Matthew R. ; Dulla, Joseph ; Dawes, Jay J. ; Orr, Rob Marc ; Lockie, Robert G. / A Pilot Analysis of the Effects of Custody Shift Length on the Health and Fitness Characteristics of Deputy Sheriffs. Poster session presented at 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, Costa Mesa, United States.
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title = "A Pilot Analysis of the Effects of Custody Shift Length on the Health and Fitness Characteristics of Deputy Sheriffs",
abstract = "Within law enforcement agencies deputy sheriffs are primarily responsible for maintaining order and protecting a community by enforcing laws. Deputy sheriffs may work in custody facilities, where the primary job tasks are inmate supervision and if necessary, restraint. Following custody, deputy sheriffs may be assigned to patrol, where job tasks include the prevention of illegal activities, emergency response, and ensuring the safety of citizens. Depending on the position, shift hours can range from 8- 16 hours (or longer with overtime). Longer shifts may allow for more days off, which in some ways is preferable for some individuals, as it could allow for more family and recreational time. However, long shifts may contribute to greater fatigue and insufficient sleep. The purpose of this study was to provide a pilot analysis as to the potential impact shift length could have on the health and fitness of deputy sheriffs who have been working in custody. A retrospective examination was conducted on 60 deputies. The deputies self-reported their average shift length per week, which provided a split of deputies who typically had custody shift lengths of 12 hours or less (32 males, 5 females), or shifts greater than 12 hours (15 males, 7 females). Health and fitness assessments included: resting heart rate (RHR); resting blood pressure; fat and lean body mass measured via bioelectrical impedance; waist and hip circumference; waist-to-hip ratio (WHR); grip strength; push-ups and sit-ups in 60 s; and recovery heart rate from a YMCA 3-min step test. To compare any differences between the groups, univariate repeated measures ANOVA with sex as a covariate was utilized (p < 0.05). After evaluating the information, it was apparent that there were few differences between the groups. However, the RHR of deputies who worked shift hours longer than 12 hours had a significantly lower RHR (80.73 ± 9.47 bpm) in comparison to those deputies working 12 hours or less (94.03 ± 12.36 bpm). Deputies working more than 12 hours also had a significantly lower WHR (0.84 ± 0.07) than those working more than 12 hours (0.89 ± 0.06). Although this is a pilot analysis, working longer shifts had a more favorable RHR and WHR; these longer shifts could have allowed for more time off and the opportunity to make better lifestyle choices. Nonetheless, no other health or fitness characteristics differed between the groups. More investigation is required as to the impacts shift length can have on deputy sheriffs, and strategies to alleviate any negative effects.",
author = "Kayvon Pakdamanian and Kamran Pakdamanian and Moreno, {Matthew R.} and Joseph Dulla and Dawes, {Jay J.} and Orr, {Rob Marc} and Lockie, {Robert G.}",
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Pakdamanian, K, Pakdamanian, K, Moreno, MR, Dulla, J, Dawes, JJ, Orr, RM & Lockie, RG 2018, 'A Pilot Analysis of the Effects of Custody Shift Length on the Health and Fitness Characteristics of Deputy Sheriffs' 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, Costa Mesa, United States, 26/10/18 - 27/10/18, .

A Pilot Analysis of the Effects of Custody Shift Length on the Health and Fitness Characteristics of Deputy Sheriffs. / Pakdamanian, Kayvon; Pakdamanian, Kamran; Moreno, Matthew R. ; Dulla, Joseph; Dawes, Jay J.; Orr, Rob Marc; Lockie, Robert G.

2018. Poster session presented at 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, Costa Mesa, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

TY - CONF

T1 - A Pilot Analysis of the Effects of Custody Shift Length on the Health and Fitness Characteristics of Deputy Sheriffs

AU - Pakdamanian, Kayvon

AU - Pakdamanian, Kamran

AU - Moreno, Matthew R.

AU - Dulla, Joseph

AU - Dawes, Jay J.

AU - Orr, Rob Marc

AU - Lockie, Robert G.

PY - 2018/10

Y1 - 2018/10

N2 - Within law enforcement agencies deputy sheriffs are primarily responsible for maintaining order and protecting a community by enforcing laws. Deputy sheriffs may work in custody facilities, where the primary job tasks are inmate supervision and if necessary, restraint. Following custody, deputy sheriffs may be assigned to patrol, where job tasks include the prevention of illegal activities, emergency response, and ensuring the safety of citizens. Depending on the position, shift hours can range from 8- 16 hours (or longer with overtime). Longer shifts may allow for more days off, which in some ways is preferable for some individuals, as it could allow for more family and recreational time. However, long shifts may contribute to greater fatigue and insufficient sleep. The purpose of this study was to provide a pilot analysis as to the potential impact shift length could have on the health and fitness of deputy sheriffs who have been working in custody. A retrospective examination was conducted on 60 deputies. The deputies self-reported their average shift length per week, which provided a split of deputies who typically had custody shift lengths of 12 hours or less (32 males, 5 females), or shifts greater than 12 hours (15 males, 7 females). Health and fitness assessments included: resting heart rate (RHR); resting blood pressure; fat and lean body mass measured via bioelectrical impedance; waist and hip circumference; waist-to-hip ratio (WHR); grip strength; push-ups and sit-ups in 60 s; and recovery heart rate from a YMCA 3-min step test. To compare any differences between the groups, univariate repeated measures ANOVA with sex as a covariate was utilized (p < 0.05). After evaluating the information, it was apparent that there were few differences between the groups. However, the RHR of deputies who worked shift hours longer than 12 hours had a significantly lower RHR (80.73 ± 9.47 bpm) in comparison to those deputies working 12 hours or less (94.03 ± 12.36 bpm). Deputies working more than 12 hours also had a significantly lower WHR (0.84 ± 0.07) than those working more than 12 hours (0.89 ± 0.06). Although this is a pilot analysis, working longer shifts had a more favorable RHR and WHR; these longer shifts could have allowed for more time off and the opportunity to make better lifestyle choices. Nonetheless, no other health or fitness characteristics differed between the groups. More investigation is required as to the impacts shift length can have on deputy sheriffs, and strategies to alleviate any negative effects.

AB - Within law enforcement agencies deputy sheriffs are primarily responsible for maintaining order and protecting a community by enforcing laws. Deputy sheriffs may work in custody facilities, where the primary job tasks are inmate supervision and if necessary, restraint. Following custody, deputy sheriffs may be assigned to patrol, where job tasks include the prevention of illegal activities, emergency response, and ensuring the safety of citizens. Depending on the position, shift hours can range from 8- 16 hours (or longer with overtime). Longer shifts may allow for more days off, which in some ways is preferable for some individuals, as it could allow for more family and recreational time. However, long shifts may contribute to greater fatigue and insufficient sleep. The purpose of this study was to provide a pilot analysis as to the potential impact shift length could have on the health and fitness of deputy sheriffs who have been working in custody. A retrospective examination was conducted on 60 deputies. The deputies self-reported their average shift length per week, which provided a split of deputies who typically had custody shift lengths of 12 hours or less (32 males, 5 females), or shifts greater than 12 hours (15 males, 7 females). Health and fitness assessments included: resting heart rate (RHR); resting blood pressure; fat and lean body mass measured via bioelectrical impedance; waist and hip circumference; waist-to-hip ratio (WHR); grip strength; push-ups and sit-ups in 60 s; and recovery heart rate from a YMCA 3-min step test. To compare any differences between the groups, univariate repeated measures ANOVA with sex as a covariate was utilized (p < 0.05). After evaluating the information, it was apparent that there were few differences between the groups. However, the RHR of deputies who worked shift hours longer than 12 hours had a significantly lower RHR (80.73 ± 9.47 bpm) in comparison to those deputies working 12 hours or less (94.03 ± 12.36 bpm). Deputies working more than 12 hours also had a significantly lower WHR (0.84 ± 0.07) than those working more than 12 hours (0.89 ± 0.06). Although this is a pilot analysis, working longer shifts had a more favorable RHR and WHR; these longer shifts could have allowed for more time off and the opportunity to make better lifestyle choices. Nonetheless, no other health or fitness characteristics differed between the groups. More investigation is required as to the impacts shift length can have on deputy sheriffs, and strategies to alleviate any negative effects.

UR - https://www.acsm.org/docs/default-source/default-document-library/swacsm-2018-program684bdc1fc67b43fe9b81c68223661da0.pdf?sfvrsn=a95abbd4_0

M3 - Poster

ER -

Pakdamanian K, Pakdamanian K, Moreno MR, Dulla J, Dawes JJ, Orr RM et al. A Pilot Analysis of the Effects of Custody Shift Length on the Health and Fitness Characteristics of Deputy Sheriffs. 2018. Poster session presented at 38th Annual Meeting of the Southwest Regional Chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine, Costa Mesa, United States.