A multi-institution study of the impacts of concurrent work and study among university students in Australia

Mark Brosnan, Dawn Bennett, Kim Kercher, Tyler Wilson, Justin W L Keogh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

A growing number of university students balance concurrent study and work. Previous studies highlight potential benefits including heightened career awareness alongside risks including decreased study time. This study asked to what extent paid work affects university students’ self-assessment of perceived employability. The study employed an online survey with 38,458 domestic students from Australian universities; students were not working full-time. The findings suggest that full-time students who hold part-time or casual work are significantly more confident in their perceived employability, and significantly more likely to understand the relevance of their studies to their future career. Practical and theoretical implications are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalHigher Education Research and Development
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Dec 2023

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