A mixed-method study to inform the development and implementation of eHealth in a bariatric surgery service in an Australian public hospital

Charlene Wright*, Jaimon T. Kelly, Katrina L. Campbell, Rebecca Healy, Jane Musial, Kyra Hamilton

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
36 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Aim: 

This study aimed to explore patient barriers to accessing services, current technology ownership/use and digital device preferences for accessing health information/health service delivery. Additionally, it aimed to explore the Theoretical Domains Framework and the acceptability of future eHealth solutions in bariatric surgery. 

Methods: 

This mixed-method study (survey and semi-structured interviews) was conducted in a bariatric surgery service in an Australian public hospital. Quantitative data were analysed descriptively, and the qualitative data were deductively and inductively analysed. 

Results: 

This study included 117 participants (n = 102 surveyed and n = 15 interviewed). Most participants were aged ≥51 years (n = 70, 60%), and two-thirds were female (n = 76, 65%). One in three participants reported barriers to accessing services (n = 38, 37%), including parking, travel time, and taking time off work. Most participants preferred to receive or access additional health information via email (n = 84, 82%) and were willing to engage with health professionals via email (n = 92, 90%), text messages (n = 87, 85%), and telephone (n = 85, 83%). Deductive analysis of interviews generated three themes: ‘Knowledge’, ‘Social influence’ and ‘Behavioural regulation, goals and environmental resources’. The inductive analysis generated one theme: ‘Seeing a place for eHealth in service delivery’. 

Conclusion: 

This study's findings can potentially influence the development of future eHealth solutions. Text message, email, and online approaches may be suitable for delivering further information and resources to patients, particularly regarding diet and physical activity. Online health communities are being used by patients for social support and may be worth further investigation. In addition, developing a bariatric surgery mobile application may be beneficial.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)425-434
Number of pages10
JournalNutrition and Dietetics
Volume80
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sept 2023
Externally publishedYes

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