A meta-analysis of the correlates of role conflict and ambiguity

Cynthia D Fisher, Richard Gitelson

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390 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Suggests that the correlational literature concerning the relationships of role conflict and ambiguity to numerous hypothesized antecedents and consequences is still somewhat unclear after a decade of research. In the present study, meta-analysis procedures developed by F. L. Schmidt and J. E. Hunter and J. E. Hunter et al (1982) were applied to the results of 43 previous studies in an effort to draw valid conclusions about the magnitude and direction of these relationships in the population. For some correlates, apparently inconsistent research results could be ascribed largely to statistical artifacts. For other correlates, it seems that moderator research may be needed to explain conflicting results across samples.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)320-333
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume68
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 1983
Externally publishedYes

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Meta-Analysis
Research
Artifacts
Population
Direction compound

Cite this

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A meta-analysis of the correlates of role conflict and ambiguity. / Fisher, Cynthia D; Gitelson, Richard.

In: Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 68, No. 2, 01.05.1983, p. 320-333.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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