A gendered study of the working patterns of classical musicians: Implications for practice

Dawn Bennett*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite an increase in participation at all levels of the music profession, women continue to experience fewer opportunities to forge careers in music and are less likely than men to apply for leadership positions. This article presents results from a study in which 152 instrumental musicians reflected upon their professional practice and career aspirations. The study examined differences in the professional practice of male and female musicians and found female musicians to be more likely to teach, and less likely to sustain performance positions because of the difficulties associated with managing family and other commitments whilst maintaining an uninterrupted career in music. It is proposed that educators have a crucial role to play in the development of curricula reflective of the realities of professional practice in a profession where interrupted careers can result in a loss of technical skills and in outdated curricular and methodological knowledge.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)89-100
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Music Education
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2008
Externally publishedYes

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