A cross-sectional analysis of pharmaceutical industry-funded events for health professionals in Australia

Alice Fabbri, Quinn Grundy, Barbara Mintzes, Swestika Swandari, Ray Moynihan, Emily Walkom, Lisa A Bero

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10 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To analyse patterns and characteristics of pharmaceutical industry sponsorship of events for Australian health professionals and to understand the implications of recent changes in transparency provisions that no longer require reporting of payments for food and beverages.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis.

PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: 301 publicly available company transparency reports downloaded from the website of Medicines Australia, the pharmaceutical industry trade association, covering the period from October 2011 to September 2015.

RESULTS: Forty-two companies sponsored 116 845 events for health professionals, on average 608 per week with 30 attendees per event. Events typically included a broad range of health professionals: 82.0% included medical doctors, including specialists and primary care doctors, and 38.3% trainees. Oncology, surgery and endocrinology were the most frequent clinical areas of focus. Most events (64.2%) were held in a clinical setting. The median cost per event was $A263 (IQR $A153-1195) and over 90% included food and beverages.

CONCLUSIONS: Over this 4-year period, industry-sponsored events were widespread and pharmaceutical companies maintained a high frequency of contact with health professionals. Most events were held in clinical settings, suggesting a pervasive commercial presence in everyday clinical practice. Food and beverages, known to be associated with changes to prescribing practice, were almost always provided. New Australian transparency provisions explicitly exclude meals from the reporting requirements; thus, a large proportion of potentially influential payments from pharmaceutical companies to health professionals will disappear from public view.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere016701
Pages (from-to)e016701
Number of pages9
JournalBMJ Open
Volume7
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Jun 2017

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Drug Industry
Food and Beverages
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health
Endocrinology
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Meals
Primary Health Care
Industry
Medicine
Costs and Cost Analysis

Cite this

Fabbri, A., Grundy, Q., Mintzes, B., Swandari, S., Moynihan, R., Walkom, E., & Bero, L. A. (2017). A cross-sectional analysis of pharmaceutical industry-funded events for health professionals in Australia. BMJ Open, 7(6), e016701. [e016701]. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016701
Fabbri, Alice ; Grundy, Quinn ; Mintzes, Barbara ; Swandari, Swestika ; Moynihan, Ray ; Walkom, Emily ; Bero, Lisa A. / A cross-sectional analysis of pharmaceutical industry-funded events for health professionals in Australia. In: BMJ Open. 2017 ; Vol. 7, No. 6. pp. e016701.
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Fabbri, A, Grundy, Q, Mintzes, B, Swandari, S, Moynihan, R, Walkom, E & Bero, LA 2017, 'A cross-sectional analysis of pharmaceutical industry-funded events for health professionals in Australia' BMJ Open, vol. 7, no. 6, e016701, pp. e016701. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016701

A cross-sectional analysis of pharmaceutical industry-funded events for health professionals in Australia. / Fabbri, Alice; Grundy, Quinn; Mintzes, Barbara; Swandari, Swestika; Moynihan, Ray; Walkom, Emily; Bero, Lisa A.

In: BMJ Open, Vol. 7, No. 6, e016701, 30.06.2017, p. e016701.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Fabbri, Alice

AU - Grundy, Quinn

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AU - Walkom, Emily

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N1 - © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

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N2 - OBJECTIVES: To analyse patterns and characteristics of pharmaceutical industry sponsorship of events for Australian health professionals and to understand the implications of recent changes in transparency provisions that no longer require reporting of payments for food and beverages.DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis.PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: 301 publicly available company transparency reports downloaded from the website of Medicines Australia, the pharmaceutical industry trade association, covering the period from October 2011 to September 2015.RESULTS: Forty-two companies sponsored 116 845 events for health professionals, on average 608 per week with 30 attendees per event. Events typically included a broad range of health professionals: 82.0% included medical doctors, including specialists and primary care doctors, and 38.3% trainees. Oncology, surgery and endocrinology were the most frequent clinical areas of focus. Most events (64.2%) were held in a clinical setting. The median cost per event was $A263 (IQR $A153-1195) and over 90% included food and beverages.CONCLUSIONS: Over this 4-year period, industry-sponsored events were widespread and pharmaceutical companies maintained a high frequency of contact with health professionals. Most events were held in clinical settings, suggesting a pervasive commercial presence in everyday clinical practice. Food and beverages, known to be associated with changes to prescribing practice, were almost always provided. New Australian transparency provisions explicitly exclude meals from the reporting requirements; thus, a large proportion of potentially influential payments from pharmaceutical companies to health professionals will disappear from public view.

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