A comparison of upper and lower body energetics during high-intensity exercise

L. Harvey, Aaron Wiegand, Colin Solomon, C. McLellan, D. I. Lovell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: The aim of the present study was to measure and compare the aerobic, anaerobic atactic and anaerobic lactic energy system contribution during the 30-sec Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT) for the upper and lower body within the same individuals. Methods: Physically active men (N.=14) completed two WAnTs on an electronic arm ergometer and a cycle ergometer separated by three days. A fly wheel braking force corresponding to 5% and 7.5% of the participants body weight was used for the upper and lower body WAnTs respectively. Oxygen uptake and blood lactate were measured before, during and after both WAnTs, and body composition was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Results: The anaerobic lactic energy system contribution was significantly (P<0.01) higher during the upper body (60.3±5.6%) compared to the lower body (46.9±6.9%) WAnT. The contribution of the anaerobic atactic system was significantly higher (P<0.01) during the lower body (36.5±6.3%) compared to the upper body (28.3±4.9%) WAnT, with the aerobic system contribution significantly (P<0.05) higher for the lower body (16.8±2.5%) compared to the upper body (11.4±1.4%) WAnT. Conclusion: The anaerobic lactic energy system provides over 60% of the energy requirements during an upper body WAnT but provides less the 50% during the lower body WAnT. In contrast, the aerobic and anaerobic atactic energy system contribution was significantly less for the upper body WAnT compared to the lower body WAnT.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)708-713
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness
Volume55
Issue number7-8
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2015

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Milk
Exercise
Photon Absorptiometry
Body Composition
Diptera
Lactic Acid
Body Weight
Oxygen

Cite this

Harvey, L., Wiegand, A., Solomon, C., McLellan, C., & Lovell, D. I. (2015). A comparison of upper and lower body energetics during high-intensity exercise. Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 55(7-8), 708-713.
Harvey, L. ; Wiegand, Aaron ; Solomon, Colin ; McLellan, C. ; Lovell, D. I. / A comparison of upper and lower body energetics during high-intensity exercise. In: Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness. 2015 ; Vol. 55, No. 7-8. pp. 708-713.
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Harvey, L, Wiegand, A, Solomon, C, McLellan, C & Lovell, DI 2015, 'A comparison of upper and lower body energetics during high-intensity exercise' Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, vol. 55, no. 7-8, pp. 708-713.

A comparison of upper and lower body energetics during high-intensity exercise. / Harvey, L.; Wiegand, Aaron; Solomon, Colin; McLellan, C.; Lovell, D. I.

In: Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, Vol. 55, No. 7-8, 01.07.2015, p. 708-713.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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N2 - Aim: The aim of the present study was to measure and compare the aerobic, anaerobic atactic and anaerobic lactic energy system contribution during the 30-sec Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT) for the upper and lower body within the same individuals. Methods: Physically active men (N.=14) completed two WAnTs on an electronic arm ergometer and a cycle ergometer separated by three days. A fly wheel braking force corresponding to 5% and 7.5% of the participants body weight was used for the upper and lower body WAnTs respectively. Oxygen uptake and blood lactate were measured before, during and after both WAnTs, and body composition was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Results: The anaerobic lactic energy system contribution was significantly (P<0.01) higher during the upper body (60.3±5.6%) compared to the lower body (46.9±6.9%) WAnT. The contribution of the anaerobic atactic system was significantly higher (P<0.01) during the lower body (36.5±6.3%) compared to the upper body (28.3±4.9%) WAnT, with the aerobic system contribution significantly (P<0.05) higher for the lower body (16.8±2.5%) compared to the upper body (11.4±1.4%) WAnT. Conclusion: The anaerobic lactic energy system provides over 60% of the energy requirements during an upper body WAnT but provides less the 50% during the lower body WAnT. In contrast, the aerobic and anaerobic atactic energy system contribution was significantly less for the upper body WAnT compared to the lower body WAnT.

AB - Aim: The aim of the present study was to measure and compare the aerobic, anaerobic atactic and anaerobic lactic energy system contribution during the 30-sec Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT) for the upper and lower body within the same individuals. Methods: Physically active men (N.=14) completed two WAnTs on an electronic arm ergometer and a cycle ergometer separated by three days. A fly wheel braking force corresponding to 5% and 7.5% of the participants body weight was used for the upper and lower body WAnTs respectively. Oxygen uptake and blood lactate were measured before, during and after both WAnTs, and body composition was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Results: The anaerobic lactic energy system contribution was significantly (P<0.01) higher during the upper body (60.3±5.6%) compared to the lower body (46.9±6.9%) WAnT. The contribution of the anaerobic atactic system was significantly higher (P<0.01) during the lower body (36.5±6.3%) compared to the upper body (28.3±4.9%) WAnT, with the aerobic system contribution significantly (P<0.05) higher for the lower body (16.8±2.5%) compared to the upper body (11.4±1.4%) WAnT. Conclusion: The anaerobic lactic energy system provides over 60% of the energy requirements during an upper body WAnT but provides less the 50% during the lower body WAnT. In contrast, the aerobic and anaerobic atactic energy system contribution was significantly less for the upper body WAnT compared to the lower body WAnT.

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Harvey L, Wiegand A, Solomon C, McLellan C, Lovell DI. A comparison of upper and lower body energetics during high-intensity exercise. Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness. 2015 Jul 1;55(7-8):708-713.