A comparison of students who chose a traditional or a problem-based learning curriculum after failing year 2 in the traditional curriculum: A unique case study at the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine

Michelle McLean*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To canvas perceptions and experiences of students who had failed Year 2 of a traditional medical program and who chose to remain in the conventional program (n = 6) or had swapped to Curriculum 2001 (C2001), a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum (n = 14). Methods: A year after their decision regarding curriculum choice, students were canvassed (largely open-ended survey) about this decision and about their perceptions of their curricular experiences. Results: C2001 students were positive about their PBL experiences. Overwhelmingly, their decision to swap streams had been a good one. They identified PBL features as supporting their learning. Repeating traditional curriculum students were, however, more circumspect in their opinions. Conclusions: C2001 students had clearly embraced PBL. They were now medical students, largely because of PBL activities underpinned by a sound educational philosophy. This unique case study has provided additional evidence that PBL students are generally more content with their studies than their conventional curriculum counterparts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)301-303
Number of pages3
JournalTeaching and Learning in Medicine
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2004
Externally publishedYes

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