A call for judicial activism: Rapid technological developments and slow legal developments

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

In most regards, the recent judgment in Gammasonics Institute for Medical Research Pty Ltd v Comrad Medical Systems Pty Ltd [2010] NSWSC 267 (‘the Gammasonics case’) is rather uninteresting. In fact, taken at face value, the only interesting aspect of the case is that it contains a discussion of one significant legal question: that is, under what circumstances can software be classed as ‘goods’? That is no doubt an important question, not least as such a classification may determine whether a buyer of software is entitled to rely on the terms implied under the various state Sale of Goods Acts.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-35
Number of pages3
JournalAlternative Law Journal
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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technical development
medical research
sale
act
software

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A call for judicial activism : Rapid technological developments and slow legal developments. / Svantesson, Dan Jerker B.

In: Alternative Law Journal, Vol. 36, No. 1, 2011, p. 33-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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