Interview with Bond University Faculty of Law Associate Professor Wendy Bonython.

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Interview with Bond University Faculty of Law Associate Professor Wendy Bonython. Dyer says the news from the Therapeutic Goods Administration last month may have caused stress to those people with breast implants. She adds the TGA launched a crackdown on textured breast implants following about 100 cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma including four deaths in Australia linked to those devices. Dyer says according to the TGA, it would suspend eight types of breast implants covering 13% of the Australian market and unimplanted models will be pulled from the shelves. Bonython says the first concerns regarding breast implants being connected to a rare form of lymphoma was raised back in 2011. She adds last 2016, better data was captured and confirmed that there is a relationship between breast implants and the development of those types of lymphoma in some women. Bonython notes it is still an emerging area of research because they don't have a really good picture of what all the risk factors are and how they could predict which women will go on to develop cancer. She explains how the textured implants could cause lymphoma. Bonython says the TGA has taken a fairly reasoned approach to the issue. He adds the suspension prevents doctors from using the implants and the importation and exportation of the product. Bonython says it does not require those women that have those implants to have them removed immediately. He adds those women who have them should be alert, monitor and look for changes in their breasts. Bonython states since the suspension, some manufacturers have already withdrawn their products from the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods. She adds there have been class actions filed in several states in the US regarding the issue and a number of law firms in Australia are also canvassing whether or not there is enough concern to justify running a class action. Bonython notes following the suspension the TGA indicated that it is likely some of the currently suspended products will be withdrawn from the ARTG unless the manufacturer can provide sufficient additional information.

Period10 Oct 2019

Media coverage

1

Media coverage

  • Title Interview with Bond University Faculty of Law Associate Professor Wendy Bonython.
    Degree of recognitionRegional
    Media name/outletABC Gold Coast
    Media typeRadio
    Duration/Length/Size9 minutes 15 seconds
    CountryAustralia
    Date10/10/19
    DescriptionInterview with Bond University Faculty of Law Associate Professor Wendy Bonython. Dyer says the news from the Therapeutic Goods Administration last month may have caused stress to those people with breast implants. She adds the TGA launched a crackdown on textured breast implants following about 100 cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma including four deaths in Australia linked to those devices. Dyer says according to the TGA, it would suspend eight types of breast implants covering 13% of the Australian market and unimplanted models will be pulled from the shelves. Bonython says the first concerns regarding breast implants being connected to a rare form of lymphoma was raised back in 2011. She adds last 2016, better data was captured and confirmed that there is a relationship between breast implants and the development of those types of lymphoma in some women. Bonython notes it is still an emerging area of research because they don't have a really good picture of what all the risk factors are and how they could predict which women will go on to develop cancer. She explains how the textured implants could cause lymphoma. Bonython says the TGA has taken a fairly reasoned approach to the issue. He adds the suspension prevents doctors from using the implants and the importation and exportation of the product. Bonython says it does not require those women that have those implants to have them removed immediately. He adds those women who have them should be alert, monitor and look for changes in their breasts. Bonython states since the suspension, some manufacturers have already withdrawn their products from the Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods. She adds there have been class actions filed in several states in the US regarding the issue and a number of law firms in Australia are also canvassing whether or not there is enough concern to justify running a class action. Bonython notes following the suspension the TGA indicated that it is likely some of the currently suspended products will be withdrawn from the ARTG unless the manufacturer can provide sufficient additional information.
    Producer/AuthorNicole Dyer
    PersonsWendy Elizabeth Bonython